A rapid review to identify physical activity accrued whilst playing golf
ISPAH ePoster Library. Archibald D. 10/15/18; 225042; 187
Dr. Daryll Archibald
Dr. Daryll Archibald
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract Objective: To identify physical activity accrued whilst playing golf, and modifiers of physical activity accrued. Design: A rapid review of primary research studies. Quality was assessed using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute quality assessment tool for cohort and cross-sectional studies. Methods and outcomes: The following databases were searched from 1900 to March 2017: SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Google Advanced Search, ProQuest, World Health Organisation International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. All primary research investigating golf or golfers with any of the following outcomes was included: metabolic equivalent of task, oxygen uptake, energy expenditure, heart rate, step count, distance covered, strength, flexibility, balance, sedentary behaviour. Results:<\b>
Phase one searching identified 4944 citations and phase two searching identified 170 citations. In total 19 articles met inclusion criteria. Golf is primarily a moderate intensity physical activity, but may be low intensity depending upon the playing population and various modifiers. Less physical activity is accrued by those who ride a golf cart compared to those walking the course. Conclusions: Golf can be encouraged in order to attain physical activity (PA) recommendations. Further research is required into the relationship between golf and strength and flexibility physical activity recommendations, and how modifiers affect physical activity accrued. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO 2017:CRD42017058237 External funding details Dr Andrew Murray works in a clinical capacity for the European Golf Tour, and has received research funding (although not for this project) from the World Golf Foundation.
Abstract Objective: To identify physical activity accrued whilst playing golf, and modifiers of physical activity accrued. Design: A rapid review of primary research studies. Quality was assessed using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute quality assessment tool for cohort and cross-sectional studies. Methods and outcomes: The following databases were searched from 1900 to March 2017: SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Google Advanced Search, ProQuest, World Health Organisation International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. All primary research investigating golf or golfers with any of the following outcomes was included: metabolic equivalent of task, oxygen uptake, energy expenditure, heart rate, step count, distance covered, strength, flexibility, balance, sedentary behaviour. Results:<\b>
Phase one searching identified 4944 citations and phase two searching identified 170 citations. In total 19 articles met inclusion criteria. Golf is primarily a moderate intensity physical activity, but may be low intensity depending upon the playing population and various modifiers. Less physical activity is accrued by those who ride a golf cart compared to those walking the course. Conclusions: Golf can be encouraged in order to attain physical activity (PA) recommendations. Further research is required into the relationship between golf and strength and flexibility physical activity recommendations, and how modifiers affect physical activity accrued. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO 2017:CRD42017058237 External funding details Dr Andrew Murray works in a clinical capacity for the European Golf Tour, and has received research funding (although not for this project) from the World Golf Foundation.
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings