Nature-based programmes for health and wellbeing in vulnerable groups: findings from evaluative research
ISPAH ePoster Library. Gladwell V. 10/16/18; 225045; 25
Dr. Valerie Gladwell
Dr. Valerie Gladwell
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract Introduction/Background: We present findings from a number of nature-based health and wellbeing programmes for vulnerable groups, such as individuals experiencing low mental wellbeing (Wildlife Trusts), youth at risk (Wilderness Foundation UK), and older gentlemen experiencing dementia (Future Roots). Method: Primary focus will be on findings from a study on the participation of 139 individuals in Wildlife Trust projects between February 2016 and February 2017. This study assessed changes in participants’ attitudes, behaviour and mental wellbeing over the course of 12-weeks as a result of taking part in nature conservation volunteering programmes run by five Wildlife Trusts across the North, Midlands and South West of England. Results:<\b>
The principle finding was that participants’ mental wellbeing improved to a statistically significant extent over the 12-week period, and that improvements were greatest for individuals who were new to the projects. Proportion of participants reporting low wellbeing (compared to UK norms) fell from 39% at baseline to 19% at 12-weeks. Participants also reported enhanced levels of positivity, health, nature relatedness, pro-environmental behaviour, levels of physical activity, and increased contact with greenspace. Conclusion:<\b>
Attending Wildlife Trust volunteering programmes facilitates health and wellbeing improvements particularly for people with low levels of wellbeing. This has important implications for reducing the current NHS burden, by offering complimentary non-medical services to promote health and wellbeing. Evaluative methodological issues are addressed and findings from nature-based health and wellbeing programmes for vulnerable groups are discussed in relation to theory.
Abstract Introduction/Background: We present findings from a number of nature-based health and wellbeing programmes for vulnerable groups, such as individuals experiencing low mental wellbeing (Wildlife Trusts), youth at risk (Wilderness Foundation UK), and older gentlemen experiencing dementia (Future Roots). Method: Primary focus will be on findings from a study on the participation of 139 individuals in Wildlife Trust projects between February 2016 and February 2017. This study assessed changes in participants’ attitudes, behaviour and mental wellbeing over the course of 12-weeks as a result of taking part in nature conservation volunteering programmes run by five Wildlife Trusts across the North, Midlands and South West of England. Results:<\b>
The principle finding was that participants’ mental wellbeing improved to a statistically significant extent over the 12-week period, and that improvements were greatest for individuals who were new to the projects. Proportion of participants reporting low wellbeing (compared to UK norms) fell from 39% at baseline to 19% at 12-weeks. Participants also reported enhanced levels of positivity, health, nature relatedness, pro-environmental behaviour, levels of physical activity, and increased contact with greenspace. Conclusion:<\b>
Attending Wildlife Trust volunteering programmes facilitates health and wellbeing improvements particularly for people with low levels of wellbeing. This has important implications for reducing the current NHS burden, by offering complimentary non-medical services to promote health and wellbeing. Evaluative methodological issues are addressed and findings from nature-based health and wellbeing programmes for vulnerable groups are discussed in relation to theory.
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings