An examination of the capacity of community bicycle coalitions
ISPAH ePoster Library. Bopp M. 10/15/18; 225077; 44
Dr. Melissa Bopp
Dr. Melissa Bopp
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Abstract
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Abstract Bicycle coalitions serve communities in different ways, including: advocating for physical infrastructure, providing encouragement for biking, safety education and assisting with policy development, though little is known about their functioning, therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the capacity of these organizations. Methods:<\b>
Bicycle coalitions were recruited to participate in an online survey. The survey addressed: information about the coalition, leadership, communication, priorities, and partners. Basic descriptives and frequencies examined trends. Results:<\b>
Coalitions (n=61) from 4 countries completed the survey. The majority of respondents represented a city or county (n=26, 46.5%), were from larger cities (n=30, 53.5%) and were located in the USA (n=51, 91.1%). Coalitions primarily operated as a non-profit (n=44, 95.7%), 45% (n=21) had paid staff as leaders; 37% (n=17) had volunteer leaders. Common leadership skills were fundraising (n=31, 53.4%) and event planning (n=31, 53.4%). Education (n=21, 46.7%), advocacy (48.9%, n=22) and encouragement (n=17, 37.8%) were viewed as top priorities. Safety of bicyclists (n=21, 46.7%) and advocacy for infrastructure/policy (n=22, 48.9%) the focus of most activities, reflected in participation in Safe Routes to School (n=31, 53.4%), bike to work events (n=42, 72.4%) and open streets events (n=21, 36.2%). All coalitions reported using social media for communication, though most perceived that their communication strategies were not that effective. Common partners were: parks/recreation departments (n=37, 63.8%), local media (n=34, 58.6%) and transit organizations (n=28, 48.3%). Conclusion:<\b>
Bike coalitions represent a critical partner in creating activity-friendly environments and understanding their capacity allows for creating skill/capacity building programs and toolkits.
Abstract Bicycle coalitions serve communities in different ways, including: advocating for physical infrastructure, providing encouragement for biking, safety education and assisting with policy development, though little is known about their functioning, therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the capacity of these organizations. Methods:<\b>
Bicycle coalitions were recruited to participate in an online survey. The survey addressed: information about the coalition, leadership, communication, priorities, and partners. Basic descriptives and frequencies examined trends. Results:<\b>
Coalitions (n=61) from 4 countries completed the survey. The majority of respondents represented a city or county (n=26, 46.5%), were from larger cities (n=30, 53.5%) and were located in the USA (n=51, 91.1%). Coalitions primarily operated as a non-profit (n=44, 95.7%), 45% (n=21) had paid staff as leaders; 37% (n=17) had volunteer leaders. Common leadership skills were fundraising (n=31, 53.4%) and event planning (n=31, 53.4%). Education (n=21, 46.7%), advocacy (48.9%, n=22) and encouragement (n=17, 37.8%) were viewed as top priorities. Safety of bicyclists (n=21, 46.7%) and advocacy for infrastructure/policy (n=22, 48.9%) the focus of most activities, reflected in participation in Safe Routes to School (n=31, 53.4%), bike to work events (n=42, 72.4%) and open streets events (n=21, 36.2%). All coalitions reported using social media for communication, though most perceived that their communication strategies were not that effective. Common partners were: parks/recreation departments (n=37, 63.8%), local media (n=34, 58.6%) and transit organizations (n=28, 48.3%). Conclusion:<\b>
Bike coalitions represent a critical partner in creating activity-friendly environments and understanding their capacity allows for creating skill/capacity building programs and toolkits.
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