Relationship between the combination of social relationship and physical activity and difficulty initiation sleep in older people
ISPAH ePoster Library. Seol J. 10/15/18; 225089; 370
Jaehoon Seol
Jaehoon Seol
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Abstract
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Abstract Purpose:<\b>
To examine the relationships between social relationships (SR), physical activity (PA), a combination of the two, and difficulty initiating sleep (DIS) in older individuals. Methods:<\b>
The participants were 781 older Japanese adults (73.2 ± 5.4 years). We conducted two questionnaire surveys. SR was assessed using the Lubben Social Network Scale, and PA was measured using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE). We categorized people who took more than 30 min to fall asleep into the DIS group. The PASE consists of questions about leisure time, household, and work-related activities. We used logistic regression analyses to examine the associations between PA (inactive and active), SR (Good SR (GSR) and Poor SR (PSR)), a combination of these two variables, and DIS. Results:<\b>
After adjusting for confounding factors, in men, as compared with those with inactive leisure time and PSR, men with active leisure time and GSR were at low risk (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.08–0.46) for DIS. In women, as compared with those with inactive leisure time and PSR, women with active leisure time and GSR (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.28–0.83), active leisure time and PSR (OR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31–0.98), and inactive leisure time and GSR (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.28–0.90) were at low risk for DIS. However, there was no significant association between DIS and the combination of household or work-related activities and SR.Conclusions: Engaging in leisure time activities, along with SR, may effectively improve problem with falling asleep. External funding details N/A
Abstract Purpose:<\b>
To examine the relationships between social relationships (SR), physical activity (PA), a combination of the two, and difficulty initiating sleep (DIS) in older individuals. Methods:<\b>
The participants were 781 older Japanese adults (73.2 ± 5.4 years). We conducted two questionnaire surveys. SR was assessed using the Lubben Social Network Scale, and PA was measured using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE). We categorized people who took more than 30 min to fall asleep into the DIS group. The PASE consists of questions about leisure time, household, and work-related activities. We used logistic regression analyses to examine the associations between PA (inactive and active), SR (Good SR (GSR) and Poor SR (PSR)), a combination of these two variables, and DIS. Results:<\b>
After adjusting for confounding factors, in men, as compared with those with inactive leisure time and PSR, men with active leisure time and GSR were at low risk (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.08–0.46) for DIS. In women, as compared with those with inactive leisure time and PSR, women with active leisure time and GSR (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.28–0.83), active leisure time and PSR (OR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31–0.98), and inactive leisure time and GSR (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.28–0.90) were at low risk for DIS. However, there was no significant association between DIS and the combination of household or work-related activities and SR.Conclusions: Engaging in leisure time activities, along with SR, may effectively improve problem with falling asleep. External funding details N/A
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