Running the gauntlet- examining the occurrence of runner harassment
ISPAH ePoster Library. Hindley D. 10/16/18; 225109; 209
Dr. David Hindley
Dr. David Hindley
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Personal accounts of recreational runners being subjected to intrusive practices when exercising in public spaces feature conspicuously in running blogs, discussion forums, and mainstream running literature. In contrast, academic investigation of this phenomenon remains scant. The aims of the research are a) to characterise runner harassment, b) to determine the prevalence of runner harassment, and c) to analyse typical strategies employed by publicly harassed runners. Methods:<\b>
This study employed a mixed methods approach, namely an online questionnaire (N=430) then a series of semi-structured interviews (N=10) to explore recreational runner’s experiences of harassment. Thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews and open-ended survey data was undertaken to code the qualitative data to identify patterns.Findings:The survey results indicated the prevalence of runner harassment (81.4%). Verbal abuse (67.1%) and car/vehicle horns (67.4%) were the most common. Physical assault or its threat was rare, whilst there were a few instances of runners who had objects thrown at them or who had been spat at. Some respondents recalled that their way had been intentionally obstructed or that attempts had been made to pursue them either on foot or in a vehicle.Conclusions:From this study, runner harassment acts to perpetuate a number of hierarchies. There is a patriarchal social order, where there are significant differences for women and men. The accounts of harassment also speak to the notion of a mobile social order in which recreational runners are deemed to be in minority, sharing public spaces where pedestrians represent the ‘normal’ majority.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Personal accounts of recreational runners being subjected to intrusive practices when exercising in public spaces feature conspicuously in running blogs, discussion forums, and mainstream running literature. In contrast, academic investigation of this phenomenon remains scant. The aims of the research are a) to characterise runner harassment, b) to determine the prevalence of runner harassment, and c) to analyse typical strategies employed by publicly harassed runners. Methods:<\b>
This study employed a mixed methods approach, namely an online questionnaire (N=430) then a series of semi-structured interviews (N=10) to explore recreational runner’s experiences of harassment. Thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews and open-ended survey data was undertaken to code the qualitative data to identify patterns.Findings:The survey results indicated the prevalence of runner harassment (81.4%). Verbal abuse (67.1%) and car/vehicle horns (67.4%) were the most common. Physical assault or its threat was rare, whilst there were a few instances of runners who had objects thrown at them or who had been spat at. Some respondents recalled that their way had been intentionally obstructed or that attempts had been made to pursue them either on foot or in a vehicle.Conclusions:From this study, runner harassment acts to perpetuate a number of hierarchies. There is a patriarchal social order, where there are significant differences for women and men. The accounts of harassment also speak to the notion of a mobile social order in which recreational runners are deemed to be in minority, sharing public spaces where pedestrians represent the ‘normal’ majority.
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