Community-based, citizen-led approach to jogging participation- examples from jogscotland and parkrun UK
ISPAH ePoster Library. Ozakinci G. 10/15/18; 225110; 194
Dr. Gozde Ozakinci
Dr. Gozde Ozakinci
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract Purpose:A variety of programmes exist aiming to increase physical activity with differing levels of success. Approaches involving volunteers and physical activity taking place outside gym environments are popular. The purpose of the studies was to understand the facilitators and barriers of continued participation and participant characteristics when it comes to two popular community-based approaches. Methods:<\b>
Two studies will be presented. Study 1: Interviews were conducted from three 'jogscotland' groups (Scotland’s recreational running network for runners of all abilities) (N=20; 11 women; Age: 29-77). Self-determination theory guided the study and thematic analysis was used. Study 2: A cross-sectional online/paper survey of parkrunners with open-ended items (N=655;322 women; Age:16-79) was conducted in 4 UK parkrun sites using participatory action research. Results:<\b>
jogscotland data indicated several themes: inclusivity of the groups facilitating participation; social-contextual factors fostering feelings of ‘competence’ enhancing intrinsic motivation; and a combination of intrinsic and integrated regulation factors sustaining the activity.parkrun data showed that the sense of belonging to parkrun in a familial sense; sense of achievement and challenge; health/wellbeing benefits; and the event format were key factors for participation.Both groups emphasised the importance of structure and the volunteer-led nature of these activities for its success.Conclusions:These complementary data show that volunteer-led, community-based approaches to physical activity offer potential for sustainable behaviour change. Increasing access to these approaches need to be considered in policy development to increase public health benefit. External funding details The parkrun work was funded by Cancer Research Cancer Prevention BUPA Foundation Fund
Abstract Purpose:A variety of programmes exist aiming to increase physical activity with differing levels of success. Approaches involving volunteers and physical activity taking place outside gym environments are popular. The purpose of the studies was to understand the facilitators and barriers of continued participation and participant characteristics when it comes to two popular community-based approaches. Methods:<\b>
Two studies will be presented. Study 1: Interviews were conducted from three 'jogscotland' groups (Scotland’s recreational running network for runners of all abilities) (N=20; 11 women; Age: 29-77). Self-determination theory guided the study and thematic analysis was used. Study 2: A cross-sectional online/paper survey of parkrunners with open-ended items (N=655;322 women; Age:16-79) was conducted in 4 UK parkrun sites using participatory action research. Results:<\b>
jogscotland data indicated several themes: inclusivity of the groups facilitating participation; social-contextual factors fostering feelings of ‘competence’ enhancing intrinsic motivation; and a combination of intrinsic and integrated regulation factors sustaining the activity.parkrun data showed that the sense of belonging to parkrun in a familial sense; sense of achievement and challenge; health/wellbeing benefits; and the event format were key factors for participation.Both groups emphasised the importance of structure and the volunteer-led nature of these activities for its success.Conclusions:These complementary data show that volunteer-led, community-based approaches to physical activity offer potential for sustainable behaviour change. Increasing access to these approaches need to be considered in policy development to increase public health benefit. External funding details The parkrun work was funded by Cancer Research Cancer Prevention BUPA Foundation Fund
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings