A physical activity intervention manual for people who have a stoma
ISPAH ePoster Library. Hubbard G. 10/15/18; 225118; 185
Gill Hubbard
Gill Hubbard
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Abstract IntroductionEvidence shows that people who have a stoma formed reduce their level of physical activity. There are no physical activity interventions specifically for people who have a stoma. MethodsA physical activity intervention manual was developed for physical activity instructors to use when instructing people who have a stoma. The manual was informed by a focus group with seven people who have a stoma, three UK charities that provide information and support for people with a stoma, a gym session involving two people with a stoma and three gym instructors, and the literature. ResultsThere is no consensus about physical activity guidance and prescription for people who have a stoma. Advice about relevant and safe abdominal exercises is contradictory (e.g. exercise abdominal muscles to reduce hernia risk vs. do not exercise the abdominal muscles because it increases hernia risk). People in the focus group made a series of recommendations (‘top tips’) including wearing a support garment/belt, wearing flange extenders, wearing a pad inside underwear, emptying bag before starting an activity, wearing dark coloured clothing to hide any leaks, and keeping hydrated. The gym session suggests that what exercises ‘feel’ safe is often a matter of trial and error. ConclusionThe use of the manual by instructors needs to be evaluated with a group of people who have a stoma. External funding details Bowle and Cancer Research
Abstract IntroductionEvidence shows that people who have a stoma formed reduce their level of physical activity. There are no physical activity interventions specifically for people who have a stoma. MethodsA physical activity intervention manual was developed for physical activity instructors to use when instructing people who have a stoma. The manual was informed by a focus group with seven people who have a stoma, three UK charities that provide information and support for people with a stoma, a gym session involving two people with a stoma and three gym instructors, and the literature. ResultsThere is no consensus about physical activity guidance and prescription for people who have a stoma. Advice about relevant and safe abdominal exercises is contradictory (e.g. exercise abdominal muscles to reduce hernia risk vs. do not exercise the abdominal muscles because it increases hernia risk). People in the focus group made a series of recommendations (‘top tips’) including wearing a support garment/belt, wearing flange extenders, wearing a pad inside underwear, emptying bag before starting an activity, wearing dark coloured clothing to hide any leaks, and keeping hydrated. The gym session suggests that what exercises ‘feel’ safe is often a matter of trial and error. ConclusionThe use of the manual by instructors needs to be evaluated with a group of people who have a stoma. External funding details Bowle and Cancer Research
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