The carry-over effect of an aquatic-based intervention in children with cerebral palsy
ISPAH ePoster Library. Naidoo R. 10/16/18; 225119; 70
Dr. Rowena Naidoo
Dr. Rowena Naidoo
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Abstract
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Abstract BackgroundCerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in childhood. Children with CP are more likely to have decreased physical activity levels than their peers, thus they are at risk for negative health implications. However, there is a belief that aquatic exercise can be used for the improvement of the level of fitness among children with CP.ObjectiveTo determine the carry-over effect of an aquatic-based programme (postural control and balance) on land (walking, running and jumping) in children with CP pre- and post-intervention.MethodsThe study was a pretest-posttest randomised groups, cross-over design. Children (n=10) were divided into intervention (n=5) and control (n=5) groups. The intervention group participated in two 30 minute sessions a week, while the control group continued with activities as per normal. Pre- and post-intervention testing was conducted using the Gross Motor Function Measure. The ten-point programme of the Halliwick Concept was used. ResultsResults demonstrated that the aquatic therapy had a significant effect on the Gross Motor Function Measure score. The aquatic-based group showed increased growth following the intervention compared to the control group (z= -2.803, p= 0.005). Furthermore, the aquatic-based therapy improved the average score for The Gross Motor Function Measure, post-intervention.ConclusionIn conclusion, an 8-week aquatic-based intervention produced greater gains in gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy, hence producing a significant carry-over effect on land. External funding details University of KwaZulu-Natal College of Health Sciences Scholarship
Abstract BackgroundCerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in childhood. Children with CP are more likely to have decreased physical activity levels than their peers, thus they are at risk for negative health implications. However, there is a belief that aquatic exercise can be used for the improvement of the level of fitness among children with CP.ObjectiveTo determine the carry-over effect of an aquatic-based programme (postural control and balance) on land (walking, running and jumping) in children with CP pre- and post-intervention.MethodsThe study was a pretest-posttest randomised groups, cross-over design. Children (n=10) were divided into intervention (n=5) and control (n=5) groups. The intervention group participated in two 30 minute sessions a week, while the control group continued with activities as per normal. Pre- and post-intervention testing was conducted using the Gross Motor Function Measure. The ten-point programme of the Halliwick Concept was used. ResultsResults demonstrated that the aquatic therapy had a significant effect on the Gross Motor Function Measure score. The aquatic-based group showed increased growth following the intervention compared to the control group (z= -2.803, p= 0.005). Furthermore, the aquatic-based therapy improved the average score for The Gross Motor Function Measure, post-intervention.ConclusionIn conclusion, an 8-week aquatic-based intervention produced greater gains in gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy, hence producing a significant carry-over effect on land. External funding details University of KwaZulu-Natal College of Health Sciences Scholarship
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