Development of a theoretical framework of children’s school travel behaviour
ISPAH ePoster Library. Ikeda E. 10/16/18; 225141; 82
Ms. Erika Ikeda
Ms. Erika Ikeda
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Children’s school travel behaviour is associated with multiple factors across numerous levels including built and social environments, school, household and the individual. The aim of this study was to test a theoretical framework of children’s school travel behaviour using structural equation modelling. The theoretical framework was developed based on Mitra’s Behavioural Model of School Transportation.Method: A cross-sectional study of children aged 9-12 years across 19 schools was conducted in Auckland, New Zealand. An online softGIS survey was used to measure children’s travel mode and school route, and attitudes towards active school travel. Computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) with children’s parents or caregivers was conducted to measure household socio-demographics and neighbourhood perceptions. School representatives were interviewed regarding their school policy and active travel programme. Built environment attributes around children’s school route were calculated using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS Statistics 24. Structural equation modelling was performed using Mplus Version 8. Results:<\b>
Overall, 1102 children participated in the study. A new, comprehensive model of children’s school travel behaviour was supported by multiple data sources that accounted for mediating and moderating effects. Car (46.2%) was the most frequently reported travel mode followed by walking (33.9%), public transportation (12.3%), bike (3.9%), scooter (3.2%) and skateboard (0.5%). Conclusion:<\b>
The theoretical framework of children’s school travel behaviour provides a comprehensive understanding of children’s school travel behaviour. This framework can contribute to policy making to improve children’s active school travel. External funding details Health Research Council of New Zealand
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Children’s school travel behaviour is associated with multiple factors across numerous levels including built and social environments, school, household and the individual. The aim of this study was to test a theoretical framework of children’s school travel behaviour using structural equation modelling. The theoretical framework was developed based on Mitra’s Behavioural Model of School Transportation.Method: A cross-sectional study of children aged 9-12 years across 19 schools was conducted in Auckland, New Zealand. An online softGIS survey was used to measure children’s travel mode and school route, and attitudes towards active school travel. Computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) with children’s parents or caregivers was conducted to measure household socio-demographics and neighbourhood perceptions. School representatives were interviewed regarding their school policy and active travel programme. Built environment attributes around children’s school route were calculated using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS Statistics 24. Structural equation modelling was performed using Mplus Version 8. Results:<\b>
Overall, 1102 children participated in the study. A new, comprehensive model of children’s school travel behaviour was supported by multiple data sources that accounted for mediating and moderating effects. Car (46.2%) was the most frequently reported travel mode followed by walking (33.9%), public transportation (12.3%), bike (3.9%), scooter (3.2%) and skateboard (0.5%). Conclusion:<\b>
The theoretical framework of children’s school travel behaviour provides a comprehensive understanding of children’s school travel behaviour. This framework can contribute to policy making to improve children’s active school travel. External funding details Health Research Council of New Zealand
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