Technological approaches to objective measurement of fundamental movement skills in children
ISPAH ePoster Library. Ward B. 10/16/18; 225164; 274
Mr. Brodie Ward
Mr. Brodie Ward
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract The ability to rapidly and cost-effectively assess fundamental movement skills (FMS) at population levels remains a limiting step in the identification of children with the greatest needs. Current FMS assessments require substantial training, are often field based, and time intensive. Technology has the potential to overcome, or replace many of the time and resource intensive aspects of FMS assessment. However, there remains substantial barriers to the development and deployment of suitable technologies to achieve valid FMS assessment. This lecture will focus upon several promising technologies and lessons learnt in their application of objectively measuring FMS. Specifically, the use of the Microsoft® Kinect® motion capture system to measure FMS. Initially, comparing assessment scoring from point light (PL) displays produced by the Kinect®, and typical video presentations of skill performances. Fifty-three assessors scored 16 performances of 4 FMS presented as videos and PL displays using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (TGMD-2). We also present results from work looking into objectively measuring FMS through inter-trial variability in horizontal jump performances and comparing results to standardised TGMD-2 locomotor scores. Thirty-five children (7.8±2.1yrs) performed horizontal jumps in front of two Microsoft Kinect cameras. Finally, we will present research on the use of wearable blue-tooth enabled accelerometer and foot sensors to predict movement patterns. This presentation will provide an up to date overview of available technologies and propose likely avenues to successfully developing objectively measured FMS in children. External funding details Components of this presentation were supported by a research grant from the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation
Abstract The ability to rapidly and cost-effectively assess fundamental movement skills (FMS) at population levels remains a limiting step in the identification of children with the greatest needs. Current FMS assessments require substantial training, are often field based, and time intensive. Technology has the potential to overcome, or replace many of the time and resource intensive aspects of FMS assessment. However, there remains substantial barriers to the development and deployment of suitable technologies to achieve valid FMS assessment. This lecture will focus upon several promising technologies and lessons learnt in their application of objectively measuring FMS. Specifically, the use of the Microsoft® Kinect® motion capture system to measure FMS. Initially, comparing assessment scoring from point light (PL) displays produced by the Kinect®, and typical video presentations of skill performances. Fifty-three assessors scored 16 performances of 4 FMS presented as videos and PL displays using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (TGMD-2). We also present results from work looking into objectively measuring FMS through inter-trial variability in horizontal jump performances and comparing results to standardised TGMD-2 locomotor scores. Thirty-five children (7.8±2.1yrs) performed horizontal jumps in front of two Microsoft Kinect cameras. Finally, we will present research on the use of wearable blue-tooth enabled accelerometer and foot sensors to predict movement patterns. This presentation will provide an up to date overview of available technologies and propose likely avenues to successfully developing objectively measured FMS in children. External funding details Components of this presentation were supported by a research grant from the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings