Fostering interactive knowledge-to-action between research, policy and practice to promote physical activity: Experience from the cross-cutting CAPCOM subproject
ISPAH ePoster Library. Gelius P. 10/15/18; 225175; 504
Dr. Peter Gelius
Dr. Peter Gelius
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Abstract IntroductionThe CAPCOM subproject provides the Capital4Health consortium with theoretical frameworks for interactive knowledge-to-action (IK2A) and capabilities, and fosters knowledge exchange between the involved researchers, policy-makers and practitioners. It aims at increasing awareness for transdisciplinary collaboration, fostering the conceptual convergence and promoting joint action across disciplines. MethodsCAPCOM interventions included a consortium-wide transdisciplinary steering committee, an international advisory board, regular reflection interviews with subproject teams, and an online glossary of relevant concepts. Evaluation data were collected using participant observation, meeting minutes and field notes, and semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis and MaxQDA. ResultsPreliminary results suggest that partners grew increasingly aware of the importance of transdisciplinary cooperation and began using a common language over the course of the project. Advisory board meetings and reflection interviews acted as “catalytic” events for these developments. The process was slower than expected, and harmonizing discipline-specific theoretical concepts was particularly challenging. Researchers, policy-makers and professionals increasingly acted jointly in various areas, but the intensity of cooperation varied significantly between subprojects. ConclusionsMethods to foster IK2A to integrate different research disciplines, policy and practice can be an effective means to improve the development and implementation of physical activity promotion programs. However, this process is very time-consuming, especially when attempting to align concepts and methods. Cooperation tends to be easier in some environments than in others, suggesting a need for tailored, setting-specific approaches. External funding details CAPCOM is part of the Capital4Health consortium funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.
Abstract IntroductionThe CAPCOM subproject provides the Capital4Health consortium with theoretical frameworks for interactive knowledge-to-action (IK2A) and capabilities, and fosters knowledge exchange between the involved researchers, policy-makers and practitioners. It aims at increasing awareness for transdisciplinary collaboration, fostering the conceptual convergence and promoting joint action across disciplines. MethodsCAPCOM interventions included a consortium-wide transdisciplinary steering committee, an international advisory board, regular reflection interviews with subproject teams, and an online glossary of relevant concepts. Evaluation data were collected using participant observation, meeting minutes and field notes, and semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis and MaxQDA. ResultsPreliminary results suggest that partners grew increasingly aware of the importance of transdisciplinary cooperation and began using a common language over the course of the project. Advisory board meetings and reflection interviews acted as “catalytic” events for these developments. The process was slower than expected, and harmonizing discipline-specific theoretical concepts was particularly challenging. Researchers, policy-makers and professionals increasingly acted jointly in various areas, but the intensity of cooperation varied significantly between subprojects. ConclusionsMethods to foster IK2A to integrate different research disciplines, policy and practice can be an effective means to improve the development and implementation of physical activity promotion programs. However, this process is very time-consuming, especially when attempting to align concepts and methods. Cooperation tends to be easier in some environments than in others, suggesting a need for tailored, setting-specific approaches. External funding details CAPCOM is part of the Capital4Health consortium funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.
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