The impact of the built environment on physical activity and sedentary behaviour in older adults: a comparative review between high and low-middle income countries
ISPAH ePoster Library. Cleland C. 10/16/18; 225179; 511
Dr. Claire Cleland
Dr. Claire Cleland
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Global populations are rapidly ageing with the world’s ‘oldest old’ increasing threefold over the next thirty years. This demographic shift has the potential to detrimentally challenge healthcare services in both high and low-middle income countries (LMIC). Consequently, ‘Healthy Urban Ageing’ is a priority to ensure older adults stay healthy, perform physical activity (PA) and remain at home ‘Ageing in Place’ to reduce the societal burden. Therefore, the built environment (BE) and its attributes require further investigation to determine the role they have on older adults PA, sedentary behaviour (SB) and ultimately their ability to ‘Age in Place’. Despite the growth of this field a comprehensive review of high and LMIC has not been performed to determine the impact of BE attributes on PA and SB of older adults (>60 years). Methods:<\b>
Eight databases were searched using MeSH relating BE, PA and SB in older adults (English, Spanish and Portuguese) (1990-2016). Results:<\b>
Sixty papers were included in the review showing that the attributes that should be focused on to improve PA and reduce SB improving the ability to ‘Age in Place’ in high income countries are walkability, land use mix, street pattern and street lighting; whilst in LMIC walkability, access to recreation, land use mix, population density, amenities facilities and street pattern should be key priorities. Conclusions: Results highlight the need for research, policy and practice to focus on country-level recommendations to ensure they are transferable and applicable as results were found to differ between high and LMIC. External funding details ESRC-Newton Fund
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Global populations are rapidly ageing with the world’s ‘oldest old’ increasing threefold over the next thirty years. This demographic shift has the potential to detrimentally challenge healthcare services in both high and low-middle income countries (LMIC). Consequently, ‘Healthy Urban Ageing’ is a priority to ensure older adults stay healthy, perform physical activity (PA) and remain at home ‘Ageing in Place’ to reduce the societal burden. Therefore, the built environment (BE) and its attributes require further investigation to determine the role they have on older adults PA, sedentary behaviour (SB) and ultimately their ability to ‘Age in Place’. Despite the growth of this field a comprehensive review of high and LMIC has not been performed to determine the impact of BE attributes on PA and SB of older adults (>60 years). Methods:<\b>
Eight databases were searched using MeSH relating BE, PA and SB in older adults (English, Spanish and Portuguese) (1990-2016). Results:<\b>
Sixty papers were included in the review showing that the attributes that should be focused on to improve PA and reduce SB improving the ability to ‘Age in Place’ in high income countries are walkability, land use mix, street pattern and street lighting; whilst in LMIC walkability, access to recreation, land use mix, population density, amenities facilities and street pattern should be key priorities. Conclusions: Results highlight the need for research, policy and practice to focus on country-level recommendations to ensure they are transferable and applicable as results were found to differ between high and LMIC. External funding details ESRC-Newton Fund
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