Socioeconomic inequalities in participation and the amount of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity: analysis using the Health Survey for England 2008 and 2012
ISPAH ePoster Library. Scholes S. 10/15/18; 225210; 182
Shaun Scholes
Shaun Scholes
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Abstract IntroductionIt is unknown whether describing socioeconomic inequalities using the average amount of time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) masks differences in the proportion of persons that are active or differences in the amount of activity performed by those who are active.MethodsHurdle models are increasingly used in physical activity research to accommodate outcomes with a stack of zeros (non-participation) and a continuous positively-skewed part (amount amongst those active). Using the Health Survey for England (HSE 2008; 2012), we applied hurdle models to estimate inequalities in these two separate parts of MVPA data, and assess changes over time. Analyses were sex-specific and adjusted for potential confounders.ResultsDifferences in the proportions of persons active per week were largest for overall MVPA (difference in percentage active for highest- versus lowest-income tertiles: 14.9 percentage points (pp) men; 12.7pp women); walking (20.5pp; 15.8pp); and sports (22.7pp; 25.0pp). Amongst those who were active, differences in the average hours-per-week (hpw) spent active between the highest- and lowest-income tertiles were most pronounced in overall MVPA [men: 3.8hpw (95%CI: 2.6-4.9); women: 3.4hpw (2.5-4.2)]. Amongst both sexes, time spent in sports/exercise was 1.3hpw higher in the highest-income group. Time spent walking showed the opposite pattern amongst men [-1.9hpw (-2.8 to -1.0)], but showed no difference amongst women. Patterns were similar in 2008 and 2012.ConclusionsInequalities were more pronounced for participation than for the amount of activity, highlighting the importance of tackling inactivity. Our results will be updated when HSE 2016 data are available (spring 2018).
Abstract IntroductionIt is unknown whether describing socioeconomic inequalities using the average amount of time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) masks differences in the proportion of persons that are active or differences in the amount of activity performed by those who are active.MethodsHurdle models are increasingly used in physical activity research to accommodate outcomes with a stack of zeros (non-participation) and a continuous positively-skewed part (amount amongst those active). Using the Health Survey for England (HSE 2008; 2012), we applied hurdle models to estimate inequalities in these two separate parts of MVPA data, and assess changes over time. Analyses were sex-specific and adjusted for potential confounders.ResultsDifferences in the proportions of persons active per week were largest for overall MVPA (difference in percentage active for highest- versus lowest-income tertiles: 14.9 percentage points (pp) men; 12.7pp women); walking (20.5pp; 15.8pp); and sports (22.7pp; 25.0pp). Amongst those who were active, differences in the average hours-per-week (hpw) spent active between the highest- and lowest-income tertiles were most pronounced in overall MVPA [men: 3.8hpw (95%CI: 2.6-4.9); women: 3.4hpw (2.5-4.2)]. Amongst both sexes, time spent in sports/exercise was 1.3hpw higher in the highest-income group. Time spent walking showed the opposite pattern amongst men [-1.9hpw (-2.8 to -1.0)], but showed no difference amongst women. Patterns were similar in 2008 and 2012.ConclusionsInequalities were more pronounced for participation than for the amount of activity, highlighting the importance of tackling inactivity. Our results will be updated when HSE 2016 data are available (spring 2018).
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