Does engaging in a gender-sensitised community-based physical activity reduce the risks associated with cardiovascular disease?
ISPAH ePoster Library. Kelly L. 10/15/18; 225218; 443
Mr. Liam Kelly
Mr. Liam Kelly
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Abstract
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Abstract Background:<\b>
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death globally, and are particularly prevalent in middle-aged men in Ireland. Most CVDs can be prevented by addressing behavioural risk factors. However, creating suitable physical activity (PA) interventions in the right environments that can attract and support men in changing health practices has proved difficult. Evidence suggests that gender-specific strategies related to community-engagement are necessary in creating sustainable health-promotion programmes that appeal to men. This study reports on the impact of a community-based PA intervention (Men on the Move) on the CVD profile of participants. Methods:<\b>
Inactive males (n=927) were recruited across 8 counties (4 intervention [n=501]; 4 comparison-in-waiting [n=426]). Self-administered questionnaires combined with recorded outcome measures were used to gather data on participants’ at baseline, 12, 26 and 52 weeks. Data were computed in accordance with defined protocols, with descriptive and comparative means analysed. Results:<\b>
Based on international guidelines, six self-reported CVD risk factors were identified; <3 days PA per week, WC >102cm, a smoker, alcohol consumption >14 units, blood-pressure medication, and cholesterol medication. Comparative data examining incidence/prevalence of CVD risk factors at each time-point will be presented (data analysis in progress). At baseline, the majority (85.5%) of participants’ presented with at least one risk factor, with 53.1% presenting with two or more.Conclusions: Baseline findings indicate that the programme succeeded in reaching a ‘high-risk’ population group, and that there is an urgent need for more targeted gender-specific programmes that support service providers to effectively engage inactive men in PA.
Abstract Background:<\b>
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death globally, and are particularly prevalent in middle-aged men in Ireland. Most CVDs can be prevented by addressing behavioural risk factors. However, creating suitable physical activity (PA) interventions in the right environments that can attract and support men in changing health practices has proved difficult. Evidence suggests that gender-specific strategies related to community-engagement are necessary in creating sustainable health-promotion programmes that appeal to men. This study reports on the impact of a community-based PA intervention (Men on the Move) on the CVD profile of participants. Methods:<\b>
Inactive males (n=927) were recruited across 8 counties (4 intervention [n=501]; 4 comparison-in-waiting [n=426]). Self-administered questionnaires combined with recorded outcome measures were used to gather data on participants’ at baseline, 12, 26 and 52 weeks. Data were computed in accordance with defined protocols, with descriptive and comparative means analysed. Results:<\b>
Based on international guidelines, six self-reported CVD risk factors were identified; <3 days PA per week, WC >102cm, a smoker, alcohol consumption >14 units, blood-pressure medication, and cholesterol medication. Comparative data examining incidence/prevalence of CVD risk factors at each time-point will be presented (data analysis in progress). At baseline, the majority (85.5%) of participants’ presented with at least one risk factor, with 53.1% presenting with two or more.Conclusions: Baseline findings indicate that the programme succeeded in reaching a ‘high-risk’ population group, and that there is an urgent need for more targeted gender-specific programmes that support service providers to effectively engage inactive men in PA.
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