Do EMG and acceleration responses differ from heart rate responses to standing, ball games, exergames, agility activities and jumping activities in 7-12 year old children?
ISPAH ePoster Library. Pesola A. 10/15/18; 225244; 13291
Dr. Arto Pesola
Dr. Arto Pesola
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
In addition to increasing energy expenditure, physical activity induces also neuromuscular responses, which are not necessarily reflected by measuring energy expenditure. This study compared metabolic and neuromuscular responses to various physical activities in SuperPark activity park. Methods:<\b>
The subjects were 16 children who were sitting, standing, walking, jogging, shooting ice hockey, hitting and catching & throwing baseball, playing floorball, playing a football and parkour exergame, performing an agility track, scooting, jumping on a bouncy mattress and a trampoline in a randomized order for 3min with 2min breaks. Heart rate above sitting (HR), acceleration counts (ACC; waist-worn sensor) and EMG amplitude (EMG; EMG shorts) were analyzed as the last minute average and normalized to walking. Using HR as a reference method, a distance (d; least squares fit) of ACC (HR-ACC) and EMG (HR-EMG) from a perfect correlation (r=1, d=0) were calculated for each individual and activity and compared to those of jogging with paired samples t-test. Direction (+/-) of d from r=1 was checked visually. Results:<\b>
Average d of jogging HR-ACC and jogging HR-EMG from r=1 were +76,7±89,5 and -65,4±42,7, respectively. Trampoline HR-ACC (+200,7±172,3) differed from jogging HR-ACC (P<0,01). Standing (-24,2±18,9; P<0,01) and trampoline (-100,3±72,7; P<0,05) HR-EMG differed from jogging HR-EMG. Conclusion:<\b>
As compared to jogging, ACC responds more to trampoline jumping than HR and EMG responds more to standing and less to trampoline jumping than HR. Different methods can reveal different metabolic and neuromuscular responses to physical activity types. External funding details AJP received funding for activity measurements from SuperPark Inc.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
In addition to increasing energy expenditure, physical activity induces also neuromuscular responses, which are not necessarily reflected by measuring energy expenditure. This study compared metabolic and neuromuscular responses to various physical activities in SuperPark activity park. Methods:<\b>
The subjects were 16 children who were sitting, standing, walking, jogging, shooting ice hockey, hitting and catching & throwing baseball, playing floorball, playing a football and parkour exergame, performing an agility track, scooting, jumping on a bouncy mattress and a trampoline in a randomized order for 3min with 2min breaks. Heart rate above sitting (HR), acceleration counts (ACC; waist-worn sensor) and EMG amplitude (EMG; EMG shorts) were analyzed as the last minute average and normalized to walking. Using HR as a reference method, a distance (d; least squares fit) of ACC (HR-ACC) and EMG (HR-EMG) from a perfect correlation (r=1, d=0) were calculated for each individual and activity and compared to those of jogging with paired samples t-test. Direction (+/-) of d from r=1 was checked visually. Results:<\b>
Average d of jogging HR-ACC and jogging HR-EMG from r=1 were +76,7±89,5 and -65,4±42,7, respectively. Trampoline HR-ACC (+200,7±172,3) differed from jogging HR-ACC (P<0,01). Standing (-24,2±18,9; P<0,01) and trampoline (-100,3±72,7; P<0,05) HR-EMG differed from jogging HR-EMG. Conclusion:<\b>
As compared to jogging, ACC responds more to trampoline jumping than HR and EMG responds more to standing and less to trampoline jumping than HR. Different methods can reveal different metabolic and neuromuscular responses to physical activity types. External funding details AJP received funding for activity measurements from SuperPark Inc.
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