Physical activity: Perceptions and behaviours, and the association with well-being
ISPAH ePoster Library. Winter S. 10/15/18; 225246; 27
Dr. Sandra Winter
Dr. Sandra Winter
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Abstract
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Abstract Peoples' perceptions of their physical activity (PA) have been associated with health outcomes, accounting for actual levels of PA and other health determinants. This study examined the association of self-reported PA with wellbeing, and the extent to which this association was mediated by perceptions of the influence of PA on wellbeing.Participants (n=597, mean age=45.1±17.3, women=73%, education=16.0±3.9years, marital status-married=45%, never married=32%, other=23%) completed the Stanford WELL for Life survey that included questions about 10 domains of wellbeing: social connectedness, lifestyle behaviors, physical and emotional health, stress/resilience, purpose/meaning, sense of self, finances, spirituality/religiosity, and creativity. For each domain, a score from 0-10 was created. For each lifestyle behavior within the lifestyle domain, a sub-domain score from 0-10 was created. An overall wellbeing score was created by summing the 10 domain scores. Participants reported the influence of their health behaviors on their wellbeing. Linear regression analyses were conducted, controlling for age, gender, education and marital status.A 10% improvement in the PA domain score was associated with a 1.3% increase in the wellbeing score (95% CI 1.02, 1.66). Adding the perceived influence of PA to the model, the association was attenuated but still statistically significant - the increase in wellbeing decreased from 1.3% to 0.9%, primarily explained by people who perceived their PA as contributing to their wellbeing. On average, participants in this study who reported healthier PA behaviors also reported higher levels of wellbeing. This association was partially mediated by their perceptions of PA and wellbeing. External funding details Nutrilite Health Institute Wellness Fund
Abstract Peoples' perceptions of their physical activity (PA) have been associated with health outcomes, accounting for actual levels of PA and other health determinants. This study examined the association of self-reported PA with wellbeing, and the extent to which this association was mediated by perceptions of the influence of PA on wellbeing.Participants (n=597, mean age=45.1±17.3, women=73%, education=16.0±3.9years, marital status-married=45%, never married=32%, other=23%) completed the Stanford WELL for Life survey that included questions about 10 domains of wellbeing: social connectedness, lifestyle behaviors, physical and emotional health, stress/resilience, purpose/meaning, sense of self, finances, spirituality/religiosity, and creativity. For each domain, a score from 0-10 was created. For each lifestyle behavior within the lifestyle domain, a sub-domain score from 0-10 was created. An overall wellbeing score was created by summing the 10 domain scores. Participants reported the influence of their health behaviors on their wellbeing. Linear regression analyses were conducted, controlling for age, gender, education and marital status.A 10% improvement in the PA domain score was associated with a 1.3% increase in the wellbeing score (95% CI 1.02, 1.66). Adding the perceived influence of PA to the model, the association was attenuated but still statistically significant - the increase in wellbeing decreased from 1.3% to 0.9%, primarily explained by people who perceived their PA as contributing to their wellbeing. On average, participants in this study who reported healthier PA behaviors also reported higher levels of wellbeing. This association was partially mediated by their perceptions of PA and wellbeing. External funding details Nutrilite Health Institute Wellness Fund
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