Weekend catch-up sleep, physical activity and childhood obesity
ISPAH ePoster Library. Yajun Huang W. 10/16/18; 225283; 159
Dr. Wendy Yajun Huang
Dr. Wendy Yajun Huang
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
This study aimed to measure the weekend catch-up patterns of sleep and physical activity over a 2-year period, and to examine the prospective associations between these weekend patterns and obesity in Chinese children. . Methods:<\b>
Prospective data from 599 Chinese children (54% boys) in the Understand Children’s Activity and Nutrition (UCAN) cohort study were analyzed. Weekly patterns of obesogenic behaviors (physical activity and sleep duration) were assessed annually over a 2-year period. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time were determined by ActiGraph accelerometry. Data on sleep durations and sociodemographic factors were obtained from parental-reports in response to questionnaires. Weekend catch-up sleep and MVPA patterns were calculated and examined in relation to childhood obesity after controlling for sociodemographic variables and sedentary time. Results:<\b>
Every additional hour of average weekly sleep duration was associated with a 16% decrease in the odds of obesity (OR: 0.841, 95%CI: 0.709-0.999). After adjustment of average sleep duration, weekend sleep catch-up categories showed no association with obesity risk. Over a 2-year period, approximately half of the children demonstrated weekend catch-up MVPA. Weekend catch-up MVPA for less than 20 minutes (OR: 0.473, 95%CI: 0.258-0.867) or more than 20 minutes (OR: 0.505, 95%CI: 0.257-0.993) were both related to lower risk of obesity. Conclusions: Weekend catch-up sleep did not ameliorate the risk of childhood obesity, whereas weekend catch-up MVPA did reduce that risk. More research is needed to explore the factors contributing to these obesogenic behavior patterns. External funding details General Research Fund from the Research Grants Council, Hong Kong, China (GRF#451308).
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
This study aimed to measure the weekend catch-up patterns of sleep and physical activity over a 2-year period, and to examine the prospective associations between these weekend patterns and obesity in Chinese children. . Methods:<\b>
Prospective data from 599 Chinese children (54% boys) in the Understand Children’s Activity and Nutrition (UCAN) cohort study were analyzed. Weekly patterns of obesogenic behaviors (physical activity and sleep duration) were assessed annually over a 2-year period. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time were determined by ActiGraph accelerometry. Data on sleep durations and sociodemographic factors were obtained from parental-reports in response to questionnaires. Weekend catch-up sleep and MVPA patterns were calculated and examined in relation to childhood obesity after controlling for sociodemographic variables and sedentary time. Results:<\b>
Every additional hour of average weekly sleep duration was associated with a 16% decrease in the odds of obesity (OR: 0.841, 95%CI: 0.709-0.999). After adjustment of average sleep duration, weekend sleep catch-up categories showed no association with obesity risk. Over a 2-year period, approximately half of the children demonstrated weekend catch-up MVPA. Weekend catch-up MVPA for less than 20 minutes (OR: 0.473, 95%CI: 0.258-0.867) or more than 20 minutes (OR: 0.505, 95%CI: 0.257-0.993) were both related to lower risk of obesity. Conclusions: Weekend catch-up sleep did not ameliorate the risk of childhood obesity, whereas weekend catch-up MVPA did reduce that risk. More research is needed to explore the factors contributing to these obesogenic behavior patterns. External funding details General Research Fund from the Research Grants Council, Hong Kong, China (GRF#451308).
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