Relevance of physical fitness in the association of red and processed meat consumption with all–cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality: a UK Biobank cohort study
ISPAH ePoster Library. Argyridou S. Oct 15, 2018; 225290; 139
Stavroula Argyridou
Stavroula Argyridou
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Abstract Introduction It is unknown how physical fitness and diet interact with health outcomes. This study aims to examine the association of red and processed meat consumption with all–cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality and to investigate whether markers of physical fitness modify the associations.Method Data were derived from 419 136 participants within UK Biobank with information available for all covariates. A red and processed meat score was derived from a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for demographic, anthropometric and lifestyle factors were used to explore the associations between red and processed meat consumption with all–cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality. Objectively measured handgrip strength and self-reported walking pace were used as covariates and interaction terms. Results Participants were followed–up for a median of 7 years. Each additional serving of red and processed meat consumption (serving/week) was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.037 (95% CI: 1.028-1.047) for all–cause mortality; 1.030 (1.009-1.051) for cardiovascular mortality; and 1.029 (1.016-1.042) for cancer mortality. Interaction analyses showed the association of red and processed meat consumption with all–cause and cancer mortality was modified by walking pace, with brisk walkers having the lowest risk per additional serving (HR 1.025; 1.006-1.045 and 1.015; 0.990-1.040, respectively). Handgrip strength did not modify reported associations.Conclusion The consumption of red and processed meat should be limited. However, the magnitude of association with mortality may be attenuated in those with high physical fitness. External funding details Funded by: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre, Leicester
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