Efficacy of a multi-component intervention to reduce workplace sitting time in office workers: A cluster randomised controlled trial
ISPAH ePoster Library. Bailey D. 10/15/18; 225294; 199
Daniel Bailey
Daniel Bailey
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
High levels of sedentary behaviour are associated with poor metabolic health and increased risk of cardiometabolic disease and mortality. Office workers are an important population to target reduction in sedentary behaviour due to prolonged periods of sitting in the workplace. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a work-based multicomponent intervention to reduce office workers’ sitting time. Methods:<\b>
Offices (n=12; 89 workers) were randomised into an 8-week intervention (n=48) incorporating organisational (education and brainstorming session, step challenge), individual (health report feedback, software prompts, telephone support), and environmental elements (changes to workspace) or control arm. Sitting time and physical activity (activPAL) and cardiometabolic health were measured at baseline and at the end of intervention. Results:<\b>
Linear mixed modelling revealed no significant change in workplace sitting time but changes in workplace prolonged sitting time (-39 min/shift), sit-upright transitions (7.8 per shift) and stepping time (12 min/shift) at follow-up were observed, in favour of the intervention group (p<0.01). There were also significant changes in the number of sit-upright transitions (4 [0.8, 7.2] transitions/day) and total steps (550 [276, 825] steps/day) across the whole day, in favour of the intervention group. Results for cardiometabolic health markers were mixed. Conclusion:<\b>
This short multicomponent workplace intervention was unsuccessful at reducing total sitting time but successful at reducing prolonged sitting time and increasing physical activity in the workplace. The potential for incorporating such interventions into common workplace practice now requires investigation.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
High levels of sedentary behaviour are associated with poor metabolic health and increased risk of cardiometabolic disease and mortality. Office workers are an important population to target reduction in sedentary behaviour due to prolonged periods of sitting in the workplace. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a work-based multicomponent intervention to reduce office workers’ sitting time. Methods:<\b>
Offices (n=12; 89 workers) were randomised into an 8-week intervention (n=48) incorporating organisational (education and brainstorming session, step challenge), individual (health report feedback, software prompts, telephone support), and environmental elements (changes to workspace) or control arm. Sitting time and physical activity (activPAL) and cardiometabolic health were measured at baseline and at the end of intervention. Results:<\b>
Linear mixed modelling revealed no significant change in workplace sitting time but changes in workplace prolonged sitting time (-39 min/shift), sit-upright transitions (7.8 per shift) and stepping time (12 min/shift) at follow-up were observed, in favour of the intervention group (p<0.01). There were also significant changes in the number of sit-upright transitions (4 [0.8, 7.2] transitions/day) and total steps (550 [276, 825] steps/day) across the whole day, in favour of the intervention group. Results for cardiometabolic health markers were mixed. Conclusion:<\b>
This short multicomponent workplace intervention was unsuccessful at reducing total sitting time but successful at reducing prolonged sitting time and increasing physical activity in the workplace. The potential for incorporating such interventions into common workplace practice now requires investigation.
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