Change in patterns of physical activity, sedentary behaviour and health-related lifestyles on the transition to adulthood: Do sport participation matters?
ISPAH ePoster Library. Arumi I. 10/15/18; 225305; 538
Ignasi Arumi
Ignasi Arumi
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
The influence that sport participation in adolescents has on the adherence to health-related behaviours as adults is unclear. We studied the associations between changes in sports participation during the transition to young adulthood with changes in patterns of physical activity, sedentary behaviour and health-related lifestyles in a sample of Spanish adolescents. Method: A 3-year longitudinal study followed up high school students (n=113) to their first year of university (16-17-18 years old). Generalized linear models, adjusted by gender, assessed the influence of changes in sport participation (yes, no, individual, team sport) over time, total and domain-specific physical activity (IPAQ-A), tobacco and alcohol consumption (FRESC-questionnaire), fruit and vegetable consumption (24h dietary recal) and sedentary behaviour (Active Where?). Results:<\b>
Participants that consistently played sports significantly spent more time in vigorous and moderate physical activity, in physical activity at leisure time, less sitting time in specific sedentary domains and consumed more fruit and vegetables. Discussion: Physical activity levels significantly reduce during the transition from high school to university. Sport participation-based interventions might be a preventive strategy for the adoption of multiple risk behaviours on the transition from adolescence to adulthood, particularly on physical activity maintenance and prevention of sedentary behaviour.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
The influence that sport participation in adolescents has on the adherence to health-related behaviours as adults is unclear. We studied the associations between changes in sports participation during the transition to young adulthood with changes in patterns of physical activity, sedentary behaviour and health-related lifestyles in a sample of Spanish adolescents. Method: A 3-year longitudinal study followed up high school students (n=113) to their first year of university (16-17-18 years old). Generalized linear models, adjusted by gender, assessed the influence of changes in sport participation (yes, no, individual, team sport) over time, total and domain-specific physical activity (IPAQ-A), tobacco and alcohol consumption (FRESC-questionnaire), fruit and vegetable consumption (24h dietary recal) and sedentary behaviour (Active Where?). Results:<\b>
Participants that consistently played sports significantly spent more time in vigorous and moderate physical activity, in physical activity at leisure time, less sitting time in specific sedentary domains and consumed more fruit and vegetables. Discussion: Physical activity levels significantly reduce during the transition from high school to university. Sport participation-based interventions might be a preventive strategy for the adoption of multiple risk behaviours on the transition from adolescence to adulthood, particularly on physical activity maintenance and prevention of sedentary behaviour.
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