Evaluation of the Northumberland Exercise on Referral Scheme: Weight loss, physical activity and differential effects between sociodemographic sub-groups in overweight and obese referrals
ISPAH ePoster Library. Dodd-Reynolds C. 10/15/18; 225310; 171
Dr. Caroline Dodd-Reynolds
Dr. Caroline Dodd-Reynolds
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Abstract
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Abstract IntroductionExercise referral can be offered by health professionals, to inactive individuals with an existing health condition/risk (for example NICE PH54). Policy and evidence fail to consider inequalities in terms of sociodemographic factors at referral point, or impact on programme effectiveness. We report part of a wider evaluation considering obese/overweight referrals specifically.Method3,624 referrals (40% of wider evaluation referrals) for overweight/obesity (BMI>24.9 kg/m2) were made from 2009-2014 to a 24-week leisure centre-based exercise scheme in north-east England. Weight-related measurements were taken at baseline, 3 and 6 months; physical activity (PA, Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire) at baseline, 6 and 12 months. A random effect linear model accounting for repeated measures, examined associations of outcome variables and sociodemographic predictors.ResultsWeight, BMI and waist circumference were reduced at 3 (1.8 kg, -0.39 kg/m2, -2.48 cm) and 6 months (-2.2 kg, -0.31 kg/m2, -3.11 cm). Weight-related variables tended to be higher for referrals living in the 20% most deprived areas, those in receipt of benefits and those referred by GP versus practice nurse. Across all time-points, weight and PA were negatively associated with age and lower among females (p<0.001). PA increased by 6 months, remaining so at 12 months (p<0.01), and only varied by IMD quintile at 12 months when those in the most deprived 20% reported greatest PA.ConclusionExercise referral was a popular pathway for obese/overweight, resulting in modest weight reduction and increased PA. The scheme did not widen inequalities and demonstrated greatest PA benefit for those most disadvantaged.
Abstract IntroductionExercise referral can be offered by health professionals, to inactive individuals with an existing health condition/risk (for example NICE PH54). Policy and evidence fail to consider inequalities in terms of sociodemographic factors at referral point, or impact on programme effectiveness. We report part of a wider evaluation considering obese/overweight referrals specifically.Method3,624 referrals (40% of wider evaluation referrals) for overweight/obesity (BMI>24.9 kg/m2) were made from 2009-2014 to a 24-week leisure centre-based exercise scheme in north-east England. Weight-related measurements were taken at baseline, 3 and 6 months; physical activity (PA, Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire) at baseline, 6 and 12 months. A random effect linear model accounting for repeated measures, examined associations of outcome variables and sociodemographic predictors.ResultsWeight, BMI and waist circumference were reduced at 3 (1.8 kg, -0.39 kg/m2, -2.48 cm) and 6 months (-2.2 kg, -0.31 kg/m2, -3.11 cm). Weight-related variables tended to be higher for referrals living in the 20% most deprived areas, those in receipt of benefits and those referred by GP versus practice nurse. Across all time-points, weight and PA were negatively associated with age and lower among females (p<0.001). PA increased by 6 months, remaining so at 12 months (p<0.01), and only varied by IMD quintile at 12 months when those in the most deprived 20% reported greatest PA.ConclusionExercise referral was a popular pathway for obese/overweight, resulting in modest weight reduction and increased PA. The scheme did not widen inequalities and demonstrated greatest PA benefit for those most disadvantaged.
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