A novel technology-supported intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour and physical inactivity in older adults
ISPAH ePoster Library. Gray C. 10/15/18; 225318; 286
Cindy Gray
Cindy Gray
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Being sedentary is associated with poorer cardiometabolic, musculoskeletal and mental health in older adults; whilst physical activity (PA) is associated with improved disease risk and better physical functioning. Older adults typically spend 65-80% (8.5-9.6 hours) of their waking day sedentary, and many do insufficient PA. Interventions targeting sedentary behaviour (SB) and physical inactivity are therefore a priority for this age group. We aimed to develop a novel technology-supported intervention to encourage older adults to sit less and move more.Method: A person-based approach using think-aloud focus groups at four half-day workshops with community-dwelling older adults to: iteratively optimise a novel, pocket-worn SB/step count sensor and associated feedback; and develop resources to motivate older adults to improve their SB and PA. Detailed fieldnotes were analysed thematically. Results:<\b>
Most participants were enthusiastic about the pocket-worn sensor. They enjoyed reviewing their SB and step count history, and some reported trying to change their behaviour. Simple visualisations were the most popular form of SB/step count feedback. Motivating factors included better physical functioning and health: most participants described how ‘listening more’ to their body (e.g. feeling stiff after sitting too long) would help them break up sitting and move more in their daily lives. Self-improvement also emerged as a key motivator, as did finding activities that were enjoyable and/or purposeful (e.g. with other people).Conclusions: Optimised versions of the SB/step count sensor and intervention resources are currently undergoing feasibility testing ahead of a full randomised controlled trial. External funding details Funded by Chief Scientist Office for Scotland
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Being sedentary is associated with poorer cardiometabolic, musculoskeletal and mental health in older adults; whilst physical activity (PA) is associated with improved disease risk and better physical functioning. Older adults typically spend 65-80% (8.5-9.6 hours) of their waking day sedentary, and many do insufficient PA. Interventions targeting sedentary behaviour (SB) and physical inactivity are therefore a priority for this age group. We aimed to develop a novel technology-supported intervention to encourage older adults to sit less and move more.Method: A person-based approach using think-aloud focus groups at four half-day workshops with community-dwelling older adults to: iteratively optimise a novel, pocket-worn SB/step count sensor and associated feedback; and develop resources to motivate older adults to improve their SB and PA. Detailed fieldnotes were analysed thematically. Results:<\b>
Most participants were enthusiastic about the pocket-worn sensor. They enjoyed reviewing their SB and step count history, and some reported trying to change their behaviour. Simple visualisations were the most popular form of SB/step count feedback. Motivating factors included better physical functioning and health: most participants described how ‘listening more’ to their body (e.g. feeling stiff after sitting too long) would help them break up sitting and move more in their daily lives. Self-improvement also emerged as a key motivator, as did finding activities that were enjoyable and/or purposeful (e.g. with other people).Conclusions: Optimised versions of the SB/step count sensor and intervention resources are currently undergoing feasibility testing ahead of a full randomised controlled trial. External funding details Funded by Chief Scientist Office for Scotland
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