Effects of main transportation mode on physical activity and frailty in Japanese older adults living in rural areas
ISPAH ePoster Library. Abe T. 10/15/18; 225322; 112
Takumi Abe
Takumi Abe
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Abstract
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Abstract Purpose:<\b>
This study aimed to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between transportation mode (TM), physical activity (PA), and frailty status. Methods:<\b>
Mailed baseline and follow-up surveys for older adults were conducted in 2013 and 2014, respectively. This analysis included 460 Japanese older adults living in rural areas. Based on responses about main TMs, participants were categorized into car drivers, car passengers, and non-car users. PA was assessed using the International PA Questionnaire. The standardized Kihon Checklist was used to assess frailty status. Analysis of variance was used to compare total PA between those in the three TM categories. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the associations between main TM, baseline frailty (pre-frail and frail), and worsening of frailty (robust to pre-frail or frail, and pre-frail to frail) over the follow-up period. Results:<\b>
In total, 288, 132, and 40 adults exhibited robust, pre-frail, and frail statuses, respectively. The total PA of car passengers was significantly lower than that of car drivers and non-car users. Compared to car drivers, at baseline, non-car users showed significant associations with frailty (odds ratio (OR): 2.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30–4.63), but car passengers did not show associations with frailty (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.74–3.16). In longitudinal analysis, non-car users were more likely to exhibit worsening of frailty (OR: 2.97, 95% CI: 1.26–6.97), but car passengers did not exhibit worsening (OR: 1.80, 95% CI: 0.61–5.35).Conclusions: Not using cars affects frailty status, but has a small influence on PA.
Abstract Purpose:<\b>
This study aimed to investigate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between transportation mode (TM), physical activity (PA), and frailty status. Methods:<\b>
Mailed baseline and follow-up surveys for older adults were conducted in 2013 and 2014, respectively. This analysis included 460 Japanese older adults living in rural areas. Based on responses about main TMs, participants were categorized into car drivers, car passengers, and non-car users. PA was assessed using the International PA Questionnaire. The standardized Kihon Checklist was used to assess frailty status. Analysis of variance was used to compare total PA between those in the three TM categories. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the associations between main TM, baseline frailty (pre-frail and frail), and worsening of frailty (robust to pre-frail or frail, and pre-frail to frail) over the follow-up period. Results:<\b>
In total, 288, 132, and 40 adults exhibited robust, pre-frail, and frail statuses, respectively. The total PA of car passengers was significantly lower than that of car drivers and non-car users. Compared to car drivers, at baseline, non-car users showed significant associations with frailty (odds ratio (OR): 2.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30–4.63), but car passengers did not show associations with frailty (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.74–3.16). In longitudinal analysis, non-car users were more likely to exhibit worsening of frailty (OR: 2.97, 95% CI: 1.26–6.97), but car passengers did not exhibit worsening (OR: 1.80, 95% CI: 0.61–5.35).Conclusions: Not using cars affects frailty status, but has a small influence on PA.
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