Moving to an active lifestyle? A systematic review of the effects of residential relocation on walking, physical activity, and travel behaviour
ISPAH ePoster Library. Gebel K. 10/15/18; 225341; 87
Klaus Gebel
Klaus Gebel
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract Background:<\b>
Longitudinal relocation studies allow establishing the temporal sequence of cause and effect for neighbourhood environments and physical activity, a key criterion for causation. To date no systematic review has synthesised the literature on effects of residential relocation on physical activity, walking and travel behaviour. Methods:<\b>
Systematic review following the PRISMA guidelines (PROSPERO registration CRD42017077681). Databases for peer-reviewed and grey literature were systematically searched to March 2017, followed by forward and backward citation tracking. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they 1) measured changes in neighbourhood built environment attributes through residential relocation (prospectively or retrospectively); 2) included a measure of physical activity, walking, cycling, or travel modal change as an outcome; 3) were quantitative; and 4) included an English abstract. Results:<\b>
A total of 23 studies was included in the review. Among the 8 retrospective longitudinal studies, there was good evidence for the relationship between relocation and walking (consistency score [CS] >90%). For the 15 prospective longitudinal studies, the evidence for the effects of environmental change/relocation on physical activity or walking was weak to moderate (CS mostly <45%), even weaker for effects on other outcomes, including physical activity, cycling, public transport use and driving. Results from risk of bias analyses support the robustness of the findings. Conclusion:<\b>
The results are encouraging for the retrospective longitudinal relocation studies, but weaker evidence exists for the methodologically stronger prospective longitudinal relocation studies. The evidence base is currently limited. Continued longitudinal research should extend the plethora of cross-sectional studies to build higher quality evidence.
Abstract Background:<\b>
Longitudinal relocation studies allow establishing the temporal sequence of cause and effect for neighbourhood environments and physical activity, a key criterion for causation. To date no systematic review has synthesised the literature on effects of residential relocation on physical activity, walking and travel behaviour. Methods:<\b>
Systematic review following the PRISMA guidelines (PROSPERO registration CRD42017077681). Databases for peer-reviewed and grey literature were systematically searched to March 2017, followed by forward and backward citation tracking. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they 1) measured changes in neighbourhood built environment attributes through residential relocation (prospectively or retrospectively); 2) included a measure of physical activity, walking, cycling, or travel modal change as an outcome; 3) were quantitative; and 4) included an English abstract. Results:<\b>
A total of 23 studies was included in the review. Among the 8 retrospective longitudinal studies, there was good evidence for the relationship between relocation and walking (consistency score [CS] >90%). For the 15 prospective longitudinal studies, the evidence for the effects of environmental change/relocation on physical activity or walking was weak to moderate (CS mostly <45%), even weaker for effects on other outcomes, including physical activity, cycling, public transport use and driving. Results from risk of bias analyses support the robustness of the findings. Conclusion:<\b>
The results are encouraging for the retrospective longitudinal relocation studies, but weaker evidence exists for the methodologically stronger prospective longitudinal relocation studies. The evidence base is currently limited. Continued longitudinal research should extend the plethora of cross-sectional studies to build higher quality evidence.
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings