Relationship between the combination of leisure-time physical activity and fear of falls on physical function in older people
ISPAH ePoster Library. Inoue T. 10/15/18; 225343; 138
Taiki Inoue
Taiki Inoue
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Abstract
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Abstract Background:<\b>
Although both leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and fear of falls are related to physical function, little is known about the influence of combination of these on physical function.Purpose: To examine the association between the combined effect of LTPA and fear of falls and physical function in older people. Methods:<\b>
There were 535 (73.9 ±5.5 years) participants. LTPA was assessed using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly, and the score was divided by the median (i.e., active and inactive). Fear and incidence of falls in the past year were examined through a questionnaire. To evaluate lower-extremity function, we conducted the following performance tests: one-leg standing test, 5-times sit-to-stand test, timed up and go (TUG) test, and 5-m walking test. Two-way analysis of covariance was used to examine LTPA by fear of falls, and interaction and main effects of LTPA and fear of falls. Adjusted variables were age, gender, body mass index, medical history of knee and lower back pains, hypertension, and psychoactive drug use. Results:<\b>
Fear of falls was reported by 29.5%. There were no significant LTPA by fear of falls interaction for all performance tests. Significant main effects of fear of falls were found in one-leg standing test, TUG, and 5-m walking test, but those of LTPA were not observed in all performance tests.Conclusions: These results suggest that the combined effect of LTPA and fear of falls are small, and older people without fear of falls would have better physical function. External funding details N/A
Abstract Background:<\b>
Although both leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and fear of falls are related to physical function, little is known about the influence of combination of these on physical function.Purpose: To examine the association between the combined effect of LTPA and fear of falls and physical function in older people. Methods:<\b>
There were 535 (73.9 ±5.5 years) participants. LTPA was assessed using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly, and the score was divided by the median (i.e., active and inactive). Fear and incidence of falls in the past year were examined through a questionnaire. To evaluate lower-extremity function, we conducted the following performance tests: one-leg standing test, 5-times sit-to-stand test, timed up and go (TUG) test, and 5-m walking test. Two-way analysis of covariance was used to examine LTPA by fear of falls, and interaction and main effects of LTPA and fear of falls. Adjusted variables were age, gender, body mass index, medical history of knee and lower back pains, hypertension, and psychoactive drug use. Results:<\b>
Fear of falls was reported by 29.5%. There were no significant LTPA by fear of falls interaction for all performance tests. Significant main effects of fear of falls were found in one-leg standing test, TUG, and 5-m walking test, but those of LTPA were not observed in all performance tests.Conclusions: These results suggest that the combined effect of LTPA and fear of falls are small, and older people without fear of falls would have better physical function. External funding details N/A
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