Systematic review of activity spaces in studies of environment, physical activity, and health
ISPAH ePoster Library. Smith L. 10/15/18; 225366; 93
Lindsey Smith
Lindsey Smith
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Abstract
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Abstract Static measures of environmental exposures may be restrictive, however activity spaces (AS) provide a dynamic measure of mobility and describe how spaces are used. We aimed to identify methods used to delineate AS which show greatest promise for strengthening causal inference for studies of the environment and physical activity.Published and unpublished articles identified from seven electronic databases from a range of disciplines, reference lists, bibliographies, and websites up to February 2018 were systematically searched for, appraised, and analysed. We included studies if they comprise a spatial summary measure of movement, behaviour, activity, or locations visited and explicitly geo-located these locations using objective or self-reported measures. Assessments included the shape or size of an AS or environmental characteristics of it. We extracted information on study design, sample characteristics, exposure and outcome measures, spatial analytical approaches and conceptual issues discussed (e.g selective daily mobility bias and causality). Results will be presented narratively to understand the research questions answered and the methods used to further causality. Studies came from the fields of public health, social and behavioural sciences, and transport studies. Self-reported and objective measures were used and some used mixed method approaches. Relatively few studies discussed conceptual issues and improved our understanding of causality but those that did used qualitative methods to unpack mechanisms and quantitative methods to understand changes in use of space over time. This review will provide conceptual, methodological and analytical insights and describe how these may be applied to strengthen causal inference. External funding details Funding: MRC
Abstract Static measures of environmental exposures may be restrictive, however activity spaces (AS) provide a dynamic measure of mobility and describe how spaces are used. We aimed to identify methods used to delineate AS which show greatest promise for strengthening causal inference for studies of the environment and physical activity.Published and unpublished articles identified from seven electronic databases from a range of disciplines, reference lists, bibliographies, and websites up to February 2018 were systematically searched for, appraised, and analysed. We included studies if they comprise a spatial summary measure of movement, behaviour, activity, or locations visited and explicitly geo-located these locations using objective or self-reported measures. Assessments included the shape or size of an AS or environmental characteristics of it. We extracted information on study design, sample characteristics, exposure and outcome measures, spatial analytical approaches and conceptual issues discussed (e.g selective daily mobility bias and causality). Results will be presented narratively to understand the research questions answered and the methods used to further causality. Studies came from the fields of public health, social and behavioural sciences, and transport studies. Self-reported and objective measures were used and some used mixed method approaches. Relatively few studies discussed conceptual issues and improved our understanding of causality but those that did used qualitative methods to unpack mechanisms and quantitative methods to understand changes in use of space over time. This review will provide conceptual, methodological and analytical insights and describe how these may be applied to strengthen causal inference. External funding details Funding: MRC
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