Common perceived barriers and facilitators for reducing sedentary behaviour among office-workers
ISPAH ePoster Library. Ekblom Ö. 10/15/18; 225371; 8
Örjan Ekblom
Örjan Ekblom
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Abstract
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Abstract Background:<\b>
Qualitative studies identified barriers and facilitators associated with office work-related sedentary behaviour. The objective of our study was to determine the most common barriers and facilitators among office-workers, to assess subgroup differences and describe time spend sedentary in- and outside the workplace. . Methods:<\b>
Cross-sectional study among 547 Swedish office-workers (median age: 41 years (IQR=35-48), 65% women, 66% highly educated). Perceived barriers and facilitators were evaluated using questionnaires, and subgroup differences in age, gender, education and sedentary behaviour assessed with Χ2-tests. Sedentary behaviour was measured for 7 days using inclinometers (n=311). Results:<\b>
The most frequently reported barrier was: sitting is a habit (67%), which was reported more by women than men (Χ2=5.14, p=0.03) and by highly sedentary office-workers (Χ2=14.63, p<0.01). The two other most reported barriers were that standing is uncomfortable (29%) and tiring (24%). Facilitators with most support were introduction of either standing- or walking meetings (respectively 33% and 29%) and more possibilities or reminders for breaks (31%). The proportion spent sedentary was 64% at the workplace, 61% on working days and 57% on non-working days. The proportion overall standing was 28%Conclusions: This study provides a detailed understanding of sedentary office-worker’s ideas about sitting and means to reduce sitting. The identified subgroup differences in perceived barriers and facilitators stress the importance of tailored interventions and individualized support in order to reduce sedentary behaviour more effectively. Based on these results we developed an intervention of which we are currently studying the effectiveness in a large longitudinal randomized controlled trial.
Abstract Background:<\b>
Qualitative studies identified barriers and facilitators associated with office work-related sedentary behaviour. The objective of our study was to determine the most common barriers and facilitators among office-workers, to assess subgroup differences and describe time spend sedentary in- and outside the workplace. . Methods:<\b>
Cross-sectional study among 547 Swedish office-workers (median age: 41 years (IQR=35-48), 65% women, 66% highly educated). Perceived barriers and facilitators were evaluated using questionnaires, and subgroup differences in age, gender, education and sedentary behaviour assessed with Χ2-tests. Sedentary behaviour was measured for 7 days using inclinometers (n=311). Results:<\b>
The most frequently reported barrier was: sitting is a habit (67%), which was reported more by women than men (Χ2=5.14, p=0.03) and by highly sedentary office-workers (Χ2=14.63, p<0.01). The two other most reported barriers were that standing is uncomfortable (29%) and tiring (24%). Facilitators with most support were introduction of either standing- or walking meetings (respectively 33% and 29%) and more possibilities or reminders for breaks (31%). The proportion spent sedentary was 64% at the workplace, 61% on working days and 57% on non-working days. The proportion overall standing was 28%Conclusions: This study provides a detailed understanding of sedentary office-worker’s ideas about sitting and means to reduce sitting. The identified subgroup differences in perceived barriers and facilitators stress the importance of tailored interventions and individualized support in order to reduce sedentary behaviour more effectively. Based on these results we developed an intervention of which we are currently studying the effectiveness in a large longitudinal randomized controlled trial.
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