The role of exercise partner in sustained exercise participation among community-dwelling older adults: A 3-year longitudinal study
ISPAH ePoster Library. Fujii Y. 10/16/18; 225379; 151
Yuya Fujii
Yuya Fujii
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Abstract
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Abstract Purpose:<\b>
This study aimed to investigate whether the ratio of exercise participation at 3-year follow-up differs according to the presence of exercise partner and identify more favorable types of exercise partners among older adults. Methods:<\b>
A 3-year longitudinal study was conducted through a mail survey in Japan. Subjects were 688 older adults (mean age: 72.8 ± 5.6 years; men: 45.2%) who had the habit of exercising (at least once a week) at baseline. We asked them about the presence of an exercise partner, with the following options (multiple answers allowed): by oneself, with spouse, with same-gender friends, with opposite-gender friends, and with exercise experts. At the 3-year follow-up period, subjects were asked about their exercise habits again. To investigate the relationship between the presence of exercise partner at baseline and exercise participation at follow-up, a logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders was conducted. Results:<\b>
People who exercise with others showed a higher ratio of exercise participation at follow-up than those exercising by themselves (OR: 1.70, 95%CI: 1.13-2.58). Among people who exercise with others, exercise with same-gender friends (OR: 2.05, 95%CI: 1.07-3.90), opposite-gender friends (OR: 2.50, 95%CI: 1.06-5.95), and exercise experts (OR: 3.62, 95%CI: 1.37-9.57) were favorably associated with the ratio of exercise participation. Exercise with a spouse was not associated with future exercise participation. Conclusion:<\b>
The presence of exercise partner may contribute to sustained exercise participation among older adults. Especially, friends and exercise experts might be favorable types of exercise partners.
Abstract Purpose:<\b>
This study aimed to investigate whether the ratio of exercise participation at 3-year follow-up differs according to the presence of exercise partner and identify more favorable types of exercise partners among older adults. Methods:<\b>
A 3-year longitudinal study was conducted through a mail survey in Japan. Subjects were 688 older adults (mean age: 72.8 ± 5.6 years; men: 45.2%) who had the habit of exercising (at least once a week) at baseline. We asked them about the presence of an exercise partner, with the following options (multiple answers allowed): by oneself, with spouse, with same-gender friends, with opposite-gender friends, and with exercise experts. At the 3-year follow-up period, subjects were asked about their exercise habits again. To investigate the relationship between the presence of exercise partner at baseline and exercise participation at follow-up, a logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders was conducted. Results:<\b>
People who exercise with others showed a higher ratio of exercise participation at follow-up than those exercising by themselves (OR: 1.70, 95%CI: 1.13-2.58). Among people who exercise with others, exercise with same-gender friends (OR: 2.05, 95%CI: 1.07-3.90), opposite-gender friends (OR: 2.50, 95%CI: 1.06-5.95), and exercise experts (OR: 3.62, 95%CI: 1.37-9.57) were favorably associated with the ratio of exercise participation. Exercise with a spouse was not associated with future exercise participation. Conclusion:<\b>
The presence of exercise partner may contribute to sustained exercise participation among older adults. Especially, friends and exercise experts might be favorable types of exercise partners.
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