Strength and balance in mature recreational golfers: Preliminary findings
ISPAH ePoster Library. Stokes M. 10/15/18; 225383; 308
Prof. Maria Stokes
Prof. Maria Stokes
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction Older people are not active enough; of adults aged over 75, only 9% of men and 6% of women meet recommended physical activity guidelines. Participation in golf is associated with health benefits and increased life expectancy. However, possible related changes in muscle strength and balance are unknown. The long-term aim is to provide evidence to support golf as an exercise on prescription for people with chronic conditions, and as an activity which reduces the chance of disability. Method An ongoing cross-sectional study is aiming to recruit over 250 participants, including male and female golfers and non-golfers aged 18-30 and over 65 years. Strength measurements of upper and lower limbs and respiratory muscles are made using portable devices. Muscle size is measured using ultrasound imaging of upper and lower limb, and trunk muscles, as size is known to correlate closely with strength. Static and dynamic balance assessment involves timed Single Leg Stand (eyes open and closed); Functional Reach (maximum distance of reach forward beyond arm’s length); and the Star Excursion Balance Test. Results and ConclusionPreliminary results indicate lower strength and balance ability in the older age groups, as expected, but less so in golfers. Age- and sex-specific associations between playing golf and strength/balance outcomes will be determined from the full data set. The findings from this study will inform a prospective intervention study to examine the effectiveness of golf for improving strength and balance. External funding details Acknowledgement: Funded by The R&A
Abstract Introduction Older people are not active enough; of adults aged over 75, only 9% of men and 6% of women meet recommended physical activity guidelines. Participation in golf is associated with health benefits and increased life expectancy. However, possible related changes in muscle strength and balance are unknown. The long-term aim is to provide evidence to support golf as an exercise on prescription for people with chronic conditions, and as an activity which reduces the chance of disability. Method An ongoing cross-sectional study is aiming to recruit over 250 participants, including male and female golfers and non-golfers aged 18-30 and over 65 years. Strength measurements of upper and lower limbs and respiratory muscles are made using portable devices. Muscle size is measured using ultrasound imaging of upper and lower limb, and trunk muscles, as size is known to correlate closely with strength. Static and dynamic balance assessment involves timed Single Leg Stand (eyes open and closed); Functional Reach (maximum distance of reach forward beyond arm’s length); and the Star Excursion Balance Test. Results and ConclusionPreliminary results indicate lower strength and balance ability in the older age groups, as expected, but less so in golfers. Age- and sex-specific associations between playing golf and strength/balance outcomes will be determined from the full data set. The findings from this study will inform a prospective intervention study to examine the effectiveness of golf for improving strength and balance. External funding details Acknowledgement: Funded by The R&A
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