Relationship between intensities of physical activity and spiritual well-being in university students
ISPAH ePoster Library. A. Chandroo C. 10/15/18; 225402; 345
Mr. Christopher A. Chandroo
Mr. Christopher A. Chandroo
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Although the health benefits of physical activity are widely documented, it is still uncertain how intensities of physical activity and sedentary behavior are associated with other dimensions of wellness (e.g., spiritual well-being). The purpose of this study was to determine if the amount of time spent in different intensities of physical activity and sedentary behavior is related to spiritual well-being in university students. Methods:<\b>
A convenience sample of students (N=147) from an ethnically diverse religious institution, were recruited via electronic and vocal announcement to complete an online survey. The survey included questions regarding basic demographics, physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short), and spiritual well-being (Spiritual Well-Being Scale). Multiple Pearson product-moment correlation were run to determine relationships between intensity of physical activity and spiritual well-being. RESULTS: There was a significant weak positive correlation between total minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity and spiritual well-being scores, (r = .254, p = .002). However, when intensity of physical activity was analyzed separately (moderate and vigorous), only moderate physical activity maintained this significant relationship with spiritual well-being (r=.276, p=.002). Neither walking time (r=.061, p=.487) nor sedentary time (r=-.066, p=.457) was significantly associated with spiritual well-being. CONCLUSION: Although significant, the results of this study demonstrate only about 8% of moderate physical activity is explained by spiritual well-being (and/or vice versa) in university students. It remains unclear why only moderate intensity was associated with spiritual well-being and whether there is a similar relationship between moderate physical activity and religiosity.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Although the health benefits of physical activity are widely documented, it is still uncertain how intensities of physical activity and sedentary behavior are associated with other dimensions of wellness (e.g., spiritual well-being). The purpose of this study was to determine if the amount of time spent in different intensities of physical activity and sedentary behavior is related to spiritual well-being in university students. Methods:<\b>
A convenience sample of students (N=147) from an ethnically diverse religious institution, were recruited via electronic and vocal announcement to complete an online survey. The survey included questions regarding basic demographics, physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short), and spiritual well-being (Spiritual Well-Being Scale). Multiple Pearson product-moment correlation were run to determine relationships between intensity of physical activity and spiritual well-being. RESULTS: There was a significant weak positive correlation between total minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity and spiritual well-being scores, (r = .254, p = .002). However, when intensity of physical activity was analyzed separately (moderate and vigorous), only moderate physical activity maintained this significant relationship with spiritual well-being (r=.276, p=.002). Neither walking time (r=.061, p=.487) nor sedentary time (r=-.066, p=.457) was significantly associated with spiritual well-being. CONCLUSION: Although significant, the results of this study demonstrate only about 8% of moderate physical activity is explained by spiritual well-being (and/or vice versa) in university students. It remains unclear why only moderate intensity was associated with spiritual well-being and whether there is a similar relationship between moderate physical activity and religiosity.
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