Preferences for a technology-supported physical activity promotion intervention among breast cancer survivors: Findings from a mixed methods study
ISPAH ePoster Library. Phillips S. 10/15/18; 225408; 13704
Siobhan Phillips
Siobhan Phillips
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Despite the benefits of physical activity (PA) for breast cancer survivors, the majority remain insufficiently active. Remotely-delivered, technology-supported PA interventions may be a more scalable strategy to increase PA among breast cancer survivors. However, little is known about breast cancer survivors’ preferences for intervention features. This study explored survivors’ preferences for these features. . Methods:<\b>
Survivors [N=96; Mage= 55.8 (SD=10.2)] self-reported demographic and disease characteristics, PA, and interests in and preferences for intervention features via an online survey. A subset (n=28) also completed a semi-structured phone interview. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Transcribed interviews were evaluated using a thematic content analysis approach and consensus review. Results:<\b>
Quantitative data indicated the highest ranked features were: daily and weekly progress feedback (87.5%), newsfeed (86.6%), PA challenges (81.3%) and scheduling tool (79.2%). Survivors were interested in receiving progress feedback (80.2%), motivational (78.1%) and reminder (75.0%) messages. Participants varied in the type of wearable device they were interested in with 45.8% preferring a wrist worn monitor and 36.5% preferring the option to wear on the wrist or underneath/attached to clothing. Five themes emerged from interview data: (1) ease of use; (2) relevant to survivors; (3) level of structure and personalization; (4) integration with wearables and (4) provides a sense of accomplishment. Conclusions: Preferences for technology-supported physical activity intervention features varied among breast cancer survivors. Engaging survivors in developing and implementing remotely-delivered, technology-supported interventions may enhance their effectiveness. External funding details National Cancer Institute (K07CA196840) and the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Despite the benefits of physical activity (PA) for breast cancer survivors, the majority remain insufficiently active. Remotely-delivered, technology-supported PA interventions may be a more scalable strategy to increase PA among breast cancer survivors. However, little is known about breast cancer survivors’ preferences for intervention features. This study explored survivors’ preferences for these features. . Methods:<\b>
Survivors [N=96; Mage= 55.8 (SD=10.2)] self-reported demographic and disease characteristics, PA, and interests in and preferences for intervention features via an online survey. A subset (n=28) also completed a semi-structured phone interview. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Transcribed interviews were evaluated using a thematic content analysis approach and consensus review. Results:<\b>
Quantitative data indicated the highest ranked features were: daily and weekly progress feedback (87.5%), newsfeed (86.6%), PA challenges (81.3%) and scheduling tool (79.2%). Survivors were interested in receiving progress feedback (80.2%), motivational (78.1%) and reminder (75.0%) messages. Participants varied in the type of wearable device they were interested in with 45.8% preferring a wrist worn monitor and 36.5% preferring the option to wear on the wrist or underneath/attached to clothing. Five themes emerged from interview data: (1) ease of use; (2) relevant to survivors; (3) level of structure and personalization; (4) integration with wearables and (4) provides a sense of accomplishment. Conclusions: Preferences for technology-supported physical activity intervention features varied among breast cancer survivors. Engaging survivors in developing and implementing remotely-delivered, technology-supported interventions may enhance their effectiveness. External funding details National Cancer Institute (K07CA196840) and the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center.
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