The impact of sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time on 24-hour hypoglycaemia, euglycaemia and hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes
ISPAH ePoster Library. Paing A. Oct 16, 2018; 225457
Mr. Aye Paing
Mr. Aye Paing
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Abstract
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Abstract Objective: To investigate the associations of objectively measured sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with 24-hour events and duration of hypoglycaemia, euglycaemia and hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes.Method: A total of 37 participants with type 2 diabetes managed by diet modifications or metformin ± sulfonylurea ± gliptin (mean age 62.8±10.5 years) wore an activPAL3 and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM, Abbot FreeStyle Libre) for 3-14 days. Average total sedentary time and number of breaks in sedentary time/day were calculated. The following glycaemic control measures were calculated: events and time in euglycaemia (3.9-7.8mmol/l), hyperglycaemia (>7.8mmol/l), above target (>9mmol/l) and hypoglycaemia (<3.9mmol/l) per day. Linear regression analyses and normalisation method for missing glucose values were used. Results:<\b>
There was detrimental association of sedentary time with decreased time in euglycaemia (β = -0.44, CI -0.1–0.0, P = 0.04). A trend towards the detrimental association of sedentary time with time in hyperglycaemia (β = 0.36, CI -0.01–0.1, P = 0.08) and HbA1c (β = 0.89, CI -0.02–1.1, P = 0.056) was observed. Breaks in sedentary time had beneficial association with time in euglycaemia (β = 0.38, CI 0.00–0.01, P = 0.04). There was no association of sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with events in hypoglycaemia, euglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and above target.Conclusions: A reduction of total sedentary time and increased number of breaks in sedentary time should be recommended for better glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. External funding details This work is supported by School of Psychological Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde; PAL technologies Ltd (Glasgow, UK) and School of Health and Life-Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University.​​Authors thanks KM who put significant effort on participant recruitment.
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