Sitting less at work as an input to the 24-hours movement behaviours model
ISPAH ePoster Library. Maria Puig A. 10/15/18; 225467; 478
Dr. Anna Maria Puig
Dr. Anna Maria Puig
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction. How occupational sitting time affects the range of active and sedentary behaviours over a 24-hour period remains unclear. In office employees we examined differences on objectively determined sedentary and physical activity (PA) patterns between low and high occupational sitting days. Method. Spanish administrative staff (n=145; 82% female; 45± 9 years) wore an activPALTM for 7 days (24hrs). This determined daily proportions of time spent sitting, standing, on light PA (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA; %; hrs/day) and total number of sedentary breaks. Valid data covered 407 workdays. Given the recommendation to reduce occupational sitting by 2 hrs/day, progressing to <4hrs/day (Buckley et al, 2015); these days were divided by occupational sitting time (<4 hrs/day, n=83 days; 4-6 hrs/day, n=258 days; >6hrs/day, n=66 days). ANOVA identified differences between groups within (i) a 24-hour period, (ii) 8 hours of shift work and (iii) during non-work hours.Results. Compared to those showing high occupational sitting days, employees with low occupational sitting days sat less (-11.4%; -0.755 hrs/day), spent more time standing (+10.15%; +1.57hrs/day), doing LIPA (+0.82%; +0.27 hrs/day; p<0.001) and, interrupted sitting time more frequently (+6.8 breaks/day; p=0.013). During working hours, they sat less (-35.2%; -3.19 hrs/day) and spent more time standing (+29.52%; +2.03 hrs/day), doing LPA (+3.86%; +0.25 hrs/day) and MVPA (+2.6%; +0.11 hrs/day; p<0.001). Outside of working hours, employees with high sitting days interrupted sedentary time more often (+7 breaks/day; p=0.023).Conclusion. Reducing occupational sitting may improve the 24-hours movement behaviour pattern; compensation effects were only found for breaking sitting time. External funding details Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (MINEC0) of the Spanish government; as part of the project Walk@Work-App (DEP2012-37169).
Abstract Introduction. How occupational sitting time affects the range of active and sedentary behaviours over a 24-hour period remains unclear. In office employees we examined differences on objectively determined sedentary and physical activity (PA) patterns between low and high occupational sitting days. Method. Spanish administrative staff (n=145; 82% female; 45± 9 years) wore an activPALTM for 7 days (24hrs). This determined daily proportions of time spent sitting, standing, on light PA (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA; %; hrs/day) and total number of sedentary breaks. Valid data covered 407 workdays. Given the recommendation to reduce occupational sitting by 2 hrs/day, progressing to <4hrs/day (Buckley et al, 2015); these days were divided by occupational sitting time (<4 hrs/day, n=83 days; 4-6 hrs/day, n=258 days; >6hrs/day, n=66 days). ANOVA identified differences between groups within (i) a 24-hour period, (ii) 8 hours of shift work and (iii) during non-work hours.Results. Compared to those showing high occupational sitting days, employees with low occupational sitting days sat less (-11.4%; -0.755 hrs/day), spent more time standing (+10.15%; +1.57hrs/day), doing LIPA (+0.82%; +0.27 hrs/day; p<0.001) and, interrupted sitting time more frequently (+6.8 breaks/day; p=0.013). During working hours, they sat less (-35.2%; -3.19 hrs/day) and spent more time standing (+29.52%; +2.03 hrs/day), doing LPA (+3.86%; +0.25 hrs/day) and MVPA (+2.6%; +0.11 hrs/day; p<0.001). Outside of working hours, employees with high sitting days interrupted sedentary time more often (+7 breaks/day; p=0.023).Conclusion. Reducing occupational sitting may improve the 24-hours movement behaviour pattern; compensation effects were only found for breaking sitting time. External funding details Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (MINEC0) of the Spanish government; as part of the project Walk@Work-App (DEP2012-37169).
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