A new intervention model for increasing physical activity levels in fitness centres based on the Behaviour Change Wheel
ISPAH ePoster Library. López-Fernández J. 10/15/18; 225470; 1
Dr. Jorge López-Fernández
Dr. Jorge López-Fernández
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
As a health promotion environment, fitness centres could probably play a proactive role to address the high physical inactivity levels of modern societies. We used the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) to design an intervention model to increase physical activity levels in fitness centres. Methods:<\b>
This intervention was designed following the three stages defined in the BCW. In Stage 1, the target behaviour and COM-B Model were defined using a pragmatic review until saturation. In Stage 2, the intervention functions were selected using the APEASE criteria. In Stage 3, a pragmatic review was performed to identify the most efficient Behavioural Change Techniques (BCTs; taxonomy version 1) to deliver the intervention model. Finally, only those BCTs that met the APEASE criteria were selected. Results:<\b>
The intervention model addressed the six components of the COM-B model:Physical capability: designing an individualised exercise programme.Physiological capability: training users to do the proposed exercises.Physical Opportunity: providing users with an instrument to get feedback in real time.Social Opportunity: Connecting users with others with same values.Reflective motivation: making users to take part in objective selection (outcomes and behaviour), training design, and evaluation process.Automatic Motivation: asking for commitment.Moreover, eighteen BCTs were identified to deliver the intervention model defined in this research. Conclusion:<\b>
The BCW is a useful framework for designing physical activity behaviour change interventions to be delivered in fitness centres. External funding details This research has been funded by GO fit® and Coventry University.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
As a health promotion environment, fitness centres could probably play a proactive role to address the high physical inactivity levels of modern societies. We used the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) to design an intervention model to increase physical activity levels in fitness centres. Methods:<\b>
This intervention was designed following the three stages defined in the BCW. In Stage 1, the target behaviour and COM-B Model were defined using a pragmatic review until saturation. In Stage 2, the intervention functions were selected using the APEASE criteria. In Stage 3, a pragmatic review was performed to identify the most efficient Behavioural Change Techniques (BCTs; taxonomy version 1) to deliver the intervention model. Finally, only those BCTs that met the APEASE criteria were selected. Results:<\b>
The intervention model addressed the six components of the COM-B model:Physical capability: designing an individualised exercise programme.Physiological capability: training users to do the proposed exercises.Physical Opportunity: providing users with an instrument to get feedback in real time.Social Opportunity: Connecting users with others with same values.Reflective motivation: making users to take part in objective selection (outcomes and behaviour), training design, and evaluation process.Automatic Motivation: asking for commitment.Moreover, eighteen BCTs were identified to deliver the intervention model defined in this research. Conclusion:<\b>
The BCW is a useful framework for designing physical activity behaviour change interventions to be delivered in fitness centres. External funding details This research has been funded by GO fit® and Coventry University.
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