Intervention Mapping: Physical activity with socially disadvantaged women
ISPAH ePoster Library. Brook K. 10/15/18; 225478; 207
Ms. Kathryn Brook
Ms. Kathryn Brook
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Abstract
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Abstract IntroductionSocially disadvantaged women (SDW) have lower levels of physical activity (PA), health inequalities and poorer health outcomes. These are associated with social determinants of health, e.g. Socioeconomic position and ethnic minority. Developing effective behaviour change programmes for SDW is complex due to disparities such as limited income and/or culturally inappropriate settings. These intricacies are often overlooked in PA policy. Consequently, interventions aimed at SDW often fail to show adequate reach, adoption and/or maintenance of PA. Therefore, we aim to inform policy and practice by developing needs-led PA interventions with SDW using Intervention Mapping (IM). IM begins with a needs assessment and follows an iterative six step process for planning interventions. MethodNeeds assessment tasks involved regular researcher participation in local PA sessions with SDW. The researcher also conducted 17 semi-structured interviews with SDW and community PA practitioners on the topic of PA. This data was thematically analysed and used within the first step of IM: to create a logic model of the PA health problem.ResultsData gathered from interviews shows PA variety and suitable opportunities in Leeds and surrounding areas are lacking for SDW. These insights have demonstrated that the needs of SDW are essential to inform IM, PA policy and practice.ConclusionIM begins with a needs-led approach when tackling the health problem of inactivity for SDW. IM will continue to be used to design a comprehensive tool for practice and inform PA policy for SDW.
Abstract IntroductionSocially disadvantaged women (SDW) have lower levels of physical activity (PA), health inequalities and poorer health outcomes. These are associated with social determinants of health, e.g. Socioeconomic position and ethnic minority. Developing effective behaviour change programmes for SDW is complex due to disparities such as limited income and/or culturally inappropriate settings. These intricacies are often overlooked in PA policy. Consequently, interventions aimed at SDW often fail to show adequate reach, adoption and/or maintenance of PA. Therefore, we aim to inform policy and practice by developing needs-led PA interventions with SDW using Intervention Mapping (IM). IM begins with a needs assessment and follows an iterative six step process for planning interventions. MethodNeeds assessment tasks involved regular researcher participation in local PA sessions with SDW. The researcher also conducted 17 semi-structured interviews with SDW and community PA practitioners on the topic of PA. This data was thematically analysed and used within the first step of IM: to create a logic model of the PA health problem.ResultsData gathered from interviews shows PA variety and suitable opportunities in Leeds and surrounding areas are lacking for SDW. These insights have demonstrated that the needs of SDW are essential to inform IM, PA policy and practice.ConclusionIM begins with a needs-led approach when tackling the health problem of inactivity for SDW. IM will continue to be used to design a comprehensive tool for practice and inform PA policy for SDW.
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