Association between mortality and time-use composition of the 24 hour day
ISPAH ePoster Library. McGregor D. 10/16/18; 225485; 104
Duncan McGregor
Duncan McGregor
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Previous studies of the association between mortality and physical activity have used isotemporal substitution. A compositional approach allows for co-dependency between different behaviour types and the relative scale of time-use data. Methods:<\b>
A prospective analysis of NHANES 2005-06 on N=1134 adults (d=105 deaths) between ages 50-79 was undertaken using Cox Proportional Hazards regression. Daily composition of time spent in sedentary behaviour (SB), light intensity (LIPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was determined from waist-mounted accelerometer data (Actigraph 7164) and supplemented with self-reported sleep data to determine the time-use composition of the day. The association of the composition with mortality was assessed both with and without covariates.Results/findings: The composition of time spent in SB, LIPA, MVPA and sleep was significantly associated with mortality rates in the absence of covariates (p<0.001), and allowing for age and sex (p = 0.011). This association appears to be driven primarily by the deleterious associations of high SB relative to MVPA and LIPA. No significant association was found after incorporating self-reported health assessment, or lack of mobility. All models considered explained a low proportion of the observed variation (R2<0.1).Conclusions: There was some evidence of a weak association between composition of the day and mortality rates, however this could not be distinguished from an individual’s current state of health. More data, or ideally longitudinal data, is needed to better understand the association. External funding details J. Palarea-Albaladejo has been supported by the Scottish Government’s Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services Division.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Previous studies of the association between mortality and physical activity have used isotemporal substitution. A compositional approach allows for co-dependency between different behaviour types and the relative scale of time-use data. Methods:<\b>
A prospective analysis of NHANES 2005-06 on N=1134 adults (d=105 deaths) between ages 50-79 was undertaken using Cox Proportional Hazards regression. Daily composition of time spent in sedentary behaviour (SB), light intensity (LIPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was determined from waist-mounted accelerometer data (Actigraph 7164) and supplemented with self-reported sleep data to determine the time-use composition of the day. The association of the composition with mortality was assessed both with and without covariates.Results/findings: The composition of time spent in SB, LIPA, MVPA and sleep was significantly associated with mortality rates in the absence of covariates (p<0.001), and allowing for age and sex (p = 0.011). This association appears to be driven primarily by the deleterious associations of high SB relative to MVPA and LIPA. No significant association was found after incorporating self-reported health assessment, or lack of mobility. All models considered explained a low proportion of the observed variation (R2<0.1).Conclusions: There was some evidence of a weak association between composition of the day and mortality rates, however this could not be distinguished from an individual’s current state of health. More data, or ideally longitudinal data, is needed to better understand the association. External funding details J. Palarea-Albaladejo has been supported by the Scottish Government’s Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services Division.
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