Effects of active commuting and leisure-time exercise on total and non-exercise energy expenditure in individuals with overweight and obesity
ISPAH ePoster Library. Salling Quist J. 10/16/18; 225494; 198
Jonas Salling Quist
Jonas Salling Quist
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Abstract
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Abstract Background:<\b>
Controversy exist whether physical exercise affects total energy expenditure (TEE) and non-exercise energy expenditure (NonExEE) in individuals with overweight and obesity.Objective: To examine effects of active commuting and leisure-time exercise on TEE and NonExEE in individuals with overweight and obesity. Methods:<\b>
In a sub-study of a randomized controlled trial in younger, physically inactive women and men with overweight and obesity (BMI: 25-35 kg/m2), 32 participants completed 6 months of habitual lifestyle (CON, n=6), active commuting (BIKE, n=7), or leisure-time exercise of moderate (MOD, 50% VO2peak-reserve, n=13) or vigorous intensity (VIG, 70% VO2peak-reserve, n=8). TEE was measured by doubly labeled water at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Exercise energy expenditure (ExEE) was calculated based on heart rate monitoring. Here we present preliminary results. Results:<\b>
ExEE did not differ between groups (p≥0.16) as intended by study design. TEE did not change in any of the exercise groups after 3 months (p≥0.82 vs. CON). At 6 months, TEE (kcal/day) increased in VIG compared to the other groups (CON: 440 [91; 787]; BIKE: 361 [26; 696]; MOD: 352 [51; 654], all p≤0.04), but did not change in BIKE and MOD (p≥0.56 vs. CON). NonExEE (kcal/day) did not change at 3 or 6 months (p≥0.16 vs. CON) but increased in VIG compared with MOD at 6 months (399 [44; 754], p=0.03). Conclusion:<\b>
Our preliminary findings suggest that TEE and NonExEE are unaltered after 3 months of active commuting and leisure-time exercise but that TEE is increased after 6 months of vigorous intensity exercise. External funding details The study was funded by the University of Copenhagen Excellence Programme for Interdisciplinary Research (www.go.ku.dk), TrygFonden and Gerda and Aage Haensch’s Fund. Jonas Salling Quist was supported by a PhD scholarship from the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Abstract Background:<\b>
Controversy exist whether physical exercise affects total energy expenditure (TEE) and non-exercise energy expenditure (NonExEE) in individuals with overweight and obesity.Objective: To examine effects of active commuting and leisure-time exercise on TEE and NonExEE in individuals with overweight and obesity. Methods:<\b>
In a sub-study of a randomized controlled trial in younger, physically inactive women and men with overweight and obesity (BMI: 25-35 kg/m2), 32 participants completed 6 months of habitual lifestyle (CON, n=6), active commuting (BIKE, n=7), or leisure-time exercise of moderate (MOD, 50% VO2peak-reserve, n=13) or vigorous intensity (VIG, 70% VO2peak-reserve, n=8). TEE was measured by doubly labeled water at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Exercise energy expenditure (ExEE) was calculated based on heart rate monitoring. Here we present preliminary results. Results:<\b>
ExEE did not differ between groups (p≥0.16) as intended by study design. TEE did not change in any of the exercise groups after 3 months (p≥0.82 vs. CON). At 6 months, TEE (kcal/day) increased in VIG compared to the other groups (CON: 440 [91; 787]; BIKE: 361 [26; 696]; MOD: 352 [51; 654], all p≤0.04), but did not change in BIKE and MOD (p≥0.56 vs. CON). NonExEE (kcal/day) did not change at 3 or 6 months (p≥0.16 vs. CON) but increased in VIG compared with MOD at 6 months (399 [44; 754], p=0.03). Conclusion:<\b>
Our preliminary findings suggest that TEE and NonExEE are unaltered after 3 months of active commuting and leisure-time exercise but that TEE is increased after 6 months of vigorous intensity exercise. External funding details The study was funded by the University of Copenhagen Excellence Programme for Interdisciplinary Research (www.go.ku.dk), TrygFonden and Gerda and Aage Haensch’s Fund. Jonas Salling Quist was supported by a PhD scholarship from the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
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