Effect of a school-based intervention on screen time behavior and family support: the 'MOVIMENTE' program
ISPAH ePoster Library. Santos P. 10/15/18; 225516; 238
Ms. Priscila Santos
Ms. Priscila Santos
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Abstract
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Abstract Evidence on effective strategies in school-based interventions to reducing screen time (ST) and psychosocial factors are unclear, mainly in vulnerable areas. This study aimed to verify the effect of a school-based intervention on ST and family support for ST among Brazilian students.This cluster-randomized controlled study (3 intervention and 3 control schools) included 948 Brazilian adolescents from 7th to 9th grades. Intervention strategies were focused on environmental changes, teacher training and educational actions. Baseline (March/April 2017) and post-intervention (November/December 2017) evaluations included the self-reported ST (TV and computer/games) during the week days (<2 hours/day or > 2 hours/day). Adolescents reported the agreement that their parents encouraged, commented on and controlled them in reducing ST. McNemar test was performed to assess statistical significance (p ≤ 0.05) of follow-up changes. At baseline, 81.3% and 77.6% of adolescents spent > 2 hours/day on ST in the control and intervention groups, respectively. After the follow-up, there was a significant reduction of this prevalence in the intervention group (-6.6%, CI95%:-10.3;-2.8); no change occurred in control students (-5.1%, CI95%:-10.4;0.1). In the intervention group, there was a reduction in the prevalence of adolescents who agreed that the parents commented that excessive ST is harmful to health (-6.0%, CI95%:-10.3;-1.7), but no difference was found for encouragement to decrease ST (-2.4%, CI95%:-7.7;2.8) and controlling excessive ST (-2.8%,CI95%:-7.7;2.1). No change was found in control group. The results suggest that the intervention was effective in reducing ST. However, other strategies to increase family support in reducing ST need to be assessed.
Abstract Evidence on effective strategies in school-based interventions to reducing screen time (ST) and psychosocial factors are unclear, mainly in vulnerable areas. This study aimed to verify the effect of a school-based intervention on ST and family support for ST among Brazilian students.This cluster-randomized controlled study (3 intervention and 3 control schools) included 948 Brazilian adolescents from 7th to 9th grades. Intervention strategies were focused on environmental changes, teacher training and educational actions. Baseline (March/April 2017) and post-intervention (November/December 2017) evaluations included the self-reported ST (TV and computer/games) during the week days (<2 hours/day or > 2 hours/day). Adolescents reported the agreement that their parents encouraged, commented on and controlled them in reducing ST. McNemar test was performed to assess statistical significance (p ≤ 0.05) of follow-up changes. At baseline, 81.3% and 77.6% of adolescents spent > 2 hours/day on ST in the control and intervention groups, respectively. After the follow-up, there was a significant reduction of this prevalence in the intervention group (-6.6%, CI95%:-10.3;-2.8); no change occurred in control students (-5.1%, CI95%:-10.4;0.1). In the intervention group, there was a reduction in the prevalence of adolescents who agreed that the parents commented that excessive ST is harmful to health (-6.0%, CI95%:-10.3;-1.7), but no difference was found for encouragement to decrease ST (-2.4%, CI95%:-7.7;2.8) and controlling excessive ST (-2.8%,CI95%:-7.7;2.1). No change was found in control group. The results suggest that the intervention was effective in reducing ST. However, other strategies to increase family support in reducing ST need to be assessed.
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