Maintaining a high fitness physical activity pattern reduces cardiometabolic risk in Malaysian adolescents
ISPAH ePoster Library. Toumpakari Z. 10/15/18; 225517; 122
Dr. Zoi Toumpakari
Dr. Zoi Toumpakari
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Limited evidence exists on physical activity (PA) patterns and cardiometabolic risk in Malaysia. A novel high-fitness PA pattern score, characterised by high frequencies of football, cycling, and activity in the evening, after school and at the weekend, was investigated for cardioprotective associations during adolescence. Methods:<\b>
Participants (N=1,828) were from the Malaysian Health and Adolescent Longitudinal Research Team study (MyHeARTs). Adolescents self-reported PA. Body Mass Index (BMI), fitness, waist circumference, % body fat, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides were measured. Reduced Rank Regression derived a pattern incorporating the type/timing of physical activity from 13-17y, explaining 13% variation in cardiorespiratory fitness. Linear multilevel models estimated PA pattern trajectories by age. Standardised regression coefficients measured associations of PA trajectories with cardiometabolic risk at 17y adjusting for demographics, lifestyle, puberty and baseline cardiometabolic factors (in n=508 with complete data). Results:<\b>
PA pattern score was mean -0.07 (SD 1.2) at 13y and declined by mean -0.0001 (SD 0.04) per year. A higher baseline PA pattern score was associated with a decrease in systolic BP (B=-0.07, p=0.02) at 17y, and a faster decline in the pattern score was associated with an increase in later waist circumference (B=0.11, p=0.02) and BMI (B=0.11, p=0.01). There was no evidence of associations with other risk factors. Conclusion:<\b>
Targeting behaviours characteristic of a high-fitness PA pattern in early adolescence and preventing their decline, may help to reduce cardiometabolic risk later on. External funding details Funded by Medical Research Council grant MR/P013821/1.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Limited evidence exists on physical activity (PA) patterns and cardiometabolic risk in Malaysia. A novel high-fitness PA pattern score, characterised by high frequencies of football, cycling, and activity in the evening, after school and at the weekend, was investigated for cardioprotective associations during adolescence. Methods:<\b>
Participants (N=1,828) were from the Malaysian Health and Adolescent Longitudinal Research Team study (MyHeARTs). Adolescents self-reported PA. Body Mass Index (BMI), fitness, waist circumference, % body fat, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides were measured. Reduced Rank Regression derived a pattern incorporating the type/timing of physical activity from 13-17y, explaining 13% variation in cardiorespiratory fitness. Linear multilevel models estimated PA pattern trajectories by age. Standardised regression coefficients measured associations of PA trajectories with cardiometabolic risk at 17y adjusting for demographics, lifestyle, puberty and baseline cardiometabolic factors (in n=508 with complete data). Results:<\b>
PA pattern score was mean -0.07 (SD 1.2) at 13y and declined by mean -0.0001 (SD 0.04) per year. A higher baseline PA pattern score was associated with a decrease in systolic BP (B=-0.07, p=0.02) at 17y, and a faster decline in the pattern score was associated with an increase in later waist circumference (B=0.11, p=0.02) and BMI (B=0.11, p=0.01). There was no evidence of associations with other risk factors. Conclusion:<\b>
Targeting behaviours characteristic of a high-fitness PA pattern in early adolescence and preventing their decline, may help to reduce cardiometabolic risk later on. External funding details Funded by Medical Research Council grant MR/P013821/1.
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