Chronic effects of reducing sitting time on glucose metabolism: Systematic review and meta-analysis
ISPAH ePoster Library. Dempsey P. 10/15/18; 225534; 379
Dr. Paddy Dempsey
Dr. Paddy Dempsey
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction. High volumes of time spent sitting are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. However, many studies are underpowered to determine whether there are beneficial effects to be gained from minimising sitting time over the longer term. By pooling data from previous studies, and to provide a synthesized evidence-base for informing future research, we aimed to determine the chronic intervention effect of reducing sitting time on glucose metabolism in the general population.Methods. Online databases were searched for studies published up to March 2017, reporting a chronic (≥1 week) intervention to reduce sitting time and at least one glycemic outcome measure. Meta-analyses using fixed-effects models, or random-effects models (DerSimonian-Laird) for heterogeneous outcomes, were used to summarise the pooled intervention effects for each outcome, relative to control conditions.Results. We identified nine interventions reporting effectiveness for glucose, five for insulin and five for HbA1c. Most lasted less than 12 months. Sitting time interventions had a homogeneous and significant pooled effect (net of control) on insulin (-4.419 pmol/L, 95% CI: -6.558, -2.279, p<0.001) concentrations and effects that were heterogeneous and non-significant on glucose (-0.069 mmol/L, 95% CI: -0.14, 0.002, p=0.056) and HbA1c (-0.111%, 95% CI: -0.337, 0.116, p=0.339). Conclusions. Longer-term interventions to reduce sitting time have significant, albeit modest effects on insulin, but non-significant effects on glucose and HbA1c. Further longer term intervention trials are required to better understand the chronic effects on glycemic metabolism markers of reducing sitting time.
Abstract Introduction. High volumes of time spent sitting are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. However, many studies are underpowered to determine whether there are beneficial effects to be gained from minimising sitting time over the longer term. By pooling data from previous studies, and to provide a synthesized evidence-base for informing future research, we aimed to determine the chronic intervention effect of reducing sitting time on glucose metabolism in the general population.Methods. Online databases were searched for studies published up to March 2017, reporting a chronic (≥1 week) intervention to reduce sitting time and at least one glycemic outcome measure. Meta-analyses using fixed-effects models, or random-effects models (DerSimonian-Laird) for heterogeneous outcomes, were used to summarise the pooled intervention effects for each outcome, relative to control conditions.Results. We identified nine interventions reporting effectiveness for glucose, five for insulin and five for HbA1c. Most lasted less than 12 months. Sitting time interventions had a homogeneous and significant pooled effect (net of control) on insulin (-4.419 pmol/L, 95% CI: -6.558, -2.279, p<0.001) concentrations and effects that were heterogeneous and non-significant on glucose (-0.069 mmol/L, 95% CI: -0.14, 0.002, p=0.056) and HbA1c (-0.111%, 95% CI: -0.337, 0.116, p=0.339). Conclusions. Longer-term interventions to reduce sitting time have significant, albeit modest effects on insulin, but non-significant effects on glucose and HbA1c. Further longer term intervention trials are required to better understand the chronic effects on glycemic metabolism markers of reducing sitting time.
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