A focus on physical activity can help avoid unnecessary social care
ISPAH ePoster Library. McNally S. 10/15/18; 225544; 404
Mrs. Scarlett McNally
Mrs. Scarlett McNally
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Abstract The UK has a massive growing need for social care, with catastrophic knock-on effects on NHS hospital bed-usage. Physical activity reduces the need for social care; we reported this new concept in a 2017 BMJ paper. With a growing elderly population, the financial imperative to reduce social care spending should drive central/local governments, organisations, families and individuals to make changes needed in environments and expectations to support physical activity.We analyse new data showing ‘chair rise time’ improvements with simple training, reducing current/future need for assistance.We present new concepts:An older person taking up exercise can “drop a decade” to have the fitness level of someone a decade younger.Ageing is different from lack of fitnessLoss of fitness can be reduced at any age and any level of disabilitySocial care for over-65s costs the UK around £100 billion annually.Each person’s need for social care is based on what they can do, eg their ability to get to the toilet in timeHealthcare should not be passive. Physical activity should be designed into schedules.We reinforce concepts highlighted by one of us (in Exercise, miracle cure):Physical activity prevents and treats disease, better than many drugsThe message must be clear and simpleWe reiterate previous concepts:Over-40s health worsens each decade on average by one condition – most conditions amenable to primary and/or secondary prevention with exercise.The least active (25% of UK adults) gain most from starting.References on www.scarlettmcnally.co.uk (BMJ paper and Exercise).
Abstract The UK has a massive growing need for social care, with catastrophic knock-on effects on NHS hospital bed-usage. Physical activity reduces the need for social care; we reported this new concept in a 2017 BMJ paper. With a growing elderly population, the financial imperative to reduce social care spending should drive central/local governments, organisations, families and individuals to make changes needed in environments and expectations to support physical activity.We analyse new data showing ‘chair rise time’ improvements with simple training, reducing current/future need for assistance.We present new concepts:An older person taking up exercise can “drop a decade” to have the fitness level of someone a decade younger.Ageing is different from lack of fitnessLoss of fitness can be reduced at any age and any level of disabilitySocial care for over-65s costs the UK around £100 billion annually.Each person’s need for social care is based on what they can do, eg their ability to get to the toilet in timeHealthcare should not be passive. Physical activity should be designed into schedules.We reinforce concepts highlighted by one of us (in Exercise, miracle cure):Physical activity prevents and treats disease, better than many drugsThe message must be clear and simpleWe reiterate previous concepts:Over-40s health worsens each decade on average by one condition – most conditions amenable to primary and/or secondary prevention with exercise.The least active (25% of UK adults) gain most from starting.References on www.scarlettmcnally.co.uk (BMJ paper and Exercise).
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