Exploring the relationship between early childhood education students' physical activity training and self-efficacy to facilitate active opportunities in childcare
ISPAH ePoster Library. Bruijns B. 10/15/18; 225545; 450
Ms. Brianne Bruijns
Ms. Brianne Bruijns
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Early Childhood Educators influence young children's activity behaviours in childcare, and higher self-efficacy in physical activity (PA)-related domains among educators is associated with increased PA levels of children in childcare. However, it has been postulated that PA-related training during their formative education is lacking. This study sought to examine the PA training afforded to Early Childhood Education (ECE) students and how such training relates to self-efficacy to lead PA opportunities in childcare. Methods:<\b>
An expert-developed online survey is currently being administered to Canadian ECE students at interested colleges/universities (n=115) to assess their PA-related knowledge, training, and self-efficacy (17-items assessing self-efficacy). A t-test will explore differences in self-efficacy among students with no formal PA training (0 courses) to those with some PA-related education (1+ course). An ANOVA will explore inter-provincial differences in students' PA-related self-efficacy. Results:<\b>
Preliminary data suggest the majority (65.96%) of students (n=47) have not taken any PA-specific courses. Further, students' average self-efficacy ratings (0-10 rating scale) for the items 'Ensure children engage in adequate levels of moderate-to vigorous-intensity PA', 'Model appropriate PA/movement behaviours', and 'Use a variety of methods that encourage PA' are 6.74(SD=2.12), 8.06(SD=1.71), and 7.23(SD =2.51), respectively. Conclusion:<\b>
This study will highlight how PA content in Canadian ECE programs relates to students' self-efficacy to facilitate PA in childcare. The findings may suggest the need for additional PA training at the college/university level, in support of improved PA-specific learning prior to entering a childcare-based vocation.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Early Childhood Educators influence young children's activity behaviours in childcare, and higher self-efficacy in physical activity (PA)-related domains among educators is associated with increased PA levels of children in childcare. However, it has been postulated that PA-related training during their formative education is lacking. This study sought to examine the PA training afforded to Early Childhood Education (ECE) students and how such training relates to self-efficacy to lead PA opportunities in childcare. Methods:<\b>
An expert-developed online survey is currently being administered to Canadian ECE students at interested colleges/universities (n=115) to assess their PA-related knowledge, training, and self-efficacy (17-items assessing self-efficacy). A t-test will explore differences in self-efficacy among students with no formal PA training (0 courses) to those with some PA-related education (1+ course). An ANOVA will explore inter-provincial differences in students' PA-related self-efficacy. Results:<\b>
Preliminary data suggest the majority (65.96%) of students (n=47) have not taken any PA-specific courses. Further, students' average self-efficacy ratings (0-10 rating scale) for the items 'Ensure children engage in adequate levels of moderate-to vigorous-intensity PA', 'Model appropriate PA/movement behaviours', and 'Use a variety of methods that encourage PA' are 6.74(SD=2.12), 8.06(SD=1.71), and 7.23(SD =2.51), respectively. Conclusion:<\b>
This study will highlight how PA content in Canadian ECE programs relates to students' self-efficacy to facilitate PA in childcare. The findings may suggest the need for additional PA training at the college/university level, in support of improved PA-specific learning prior to entering a childcare-based vocation.
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