Physical activity and risk of myocardial infarction: An analysis of lifestyle behaviours in a large population-based cohort
ISPAH ePoster Library. Lacombe J. 10/16/18; 225546; 128
Jason Lacombe
Jason Lacombe
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Abstract
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Abstract Myocardial infarction (MI) is responsible for 200,000 hospital admissions per year in the United Kingdom (UK). Physical inactivity, an unhealthy diet, smoking, and alcohol consumption are major modifiable lifestyle risk factors for MI. Here we examined the independent associations of these four lifestyle behaviours with incident MI and all-cause mortality in UK adults. We followed a total of 349,337 participants from the prospective UK Biobank Study (recruitment 2006-11). To assess physical activity (PA), questions on the baseline touchscreen questionnaire about walking, moderate PA and vigorous PA, which are similar those found in the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, were used to estimate metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes/week of PA. Cox regression models were used to calculate the associations between PA, smoking, alcohol consumption, or fruit and vegetable intake with incident MI or all-cause mortality. During an average of 7 years follow-up, 3955 participants had experienced a first MI event, and 7230 had died. The greatest reduction in MI risk occurred in those who met PA guidelines (600-999 MET-minutes/week) when compared to inactive participants (<120 MET-minutes/week (RR=0.75, 95% FCI 0.69-0.81). No additional benefit was observed for higher levels of PA. Those who were most active (≥8000 MET-minutes/week) saw the greatest reductions in risk of death (RR=0.74, 95% FCI 0.67-0.83). Healthier levels of all four lifestyle behaviours led to reduced risk of death (ptrend <0.001). Overall, healthier behaviours reduced the risk of incident MI and all-cause mortality. External funding details Jason Lacombe is supported by the British Heart Foundation as part of a non-clinical studentship.
Abstract Myocardial infarction (MI) is responsible for 200,000 hospital admissions per year in the United Kingdom (UK). Physical inactivity, an unhealthy diet, smoking, and alcohol consumption are major modifiable lifestyle risk factors for MI. Here we examined the independent associations of these four lifestyle behaviours with incident MI and all-cause mortality in UK adults. We followed a total of 349,337 participants from the prospective UK Biobank Study (recruitment 2006-11). To assess physical activity (PA), questions on the baseline touchscreen questionnaire about walking, moderate PA and vigorous PA, which are similar those found in the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, were used to estimate metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes/week of PA. Cox regression models were used to calculate the associations between PA, smoking, alcohol consumption, or fruit and vegetable intake with incident MI or all-cause mortality. During an average of 7 years follow-up, 3955 participants had experienced a first MI event, and 7230 had died. The greatest reduction in MI risk occurred in those who met PA guidelines (600-999 MET-minutes/week) when compared to inactive participants (<120 MET-minutes/week (RR=0.75, 95% FCI 0.69-0.81). No additional benefit was observed for higher levels of PA. Those who were most active (≥8000 MET-minutes/week) saw the greatest reductions in risk of death (RR=0.74, 95% FCI 0.67-0.83). Healthier levels of all four lifestyle behaviours led to reduced risk of death (ptrend <0.001). Overall, healthier behaviours reduced the risk of incident MI and all-cause mortality. External funding details Jason Lacombe is supported by the British Heart Foundation as part of a non-clinical studentship.
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