Effects of a technology-based and teacher-directed physical activity intervention in preschoolers: Findings from a pilot study
ISPAH ePoster Library. Byun W. 10/15/18; 225555; 241
Wonwoo Byun
Wonwoo Byun
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
This pilot study evaluated the effects of an intervention employing a physical activity (PA) monitoring system and teachers’ self-directed modifications in instructional strategies to promote PA in preschoolers. Method: Five childcare centers were recruited (N = 93 children, 53% girls, 4.7 ± 0.6 years), and randomly assigned into Control (CON, N = 45) and Intervention (INT, N = 48) groups. The current intervention is based on the social ecological model. It consisted of a real-time PA monitoring system that provided teachers with instant feedback on children’s PA levels. Based on the feedback and their classroom contexts, teachers made self-directed modifications to their instructional strategies to provide more active opportunities. Time spent in sedentary behavior (SED) and total PA (TPA) were measured as primary outcomes using ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer over a 5-day period while children were attending childcare centers. Result: Overall, children in the INT showed significantly lower level of SED (31.6 vs. 33.6 min/hr), and higher level of TPA (28.4 vs. 26.4 min/hr) than children in the CON, after adjusting for age, sex, race, parent education level, parent perception of child’s PA, BMI, and childcare centers. The percentage of hours meeting the PA recommendation (≥ 15min/hr of TPA) was slightly higher the INT than the CON (47.3 % vs. 43.2 %). Conclusion:<\b>
This technology-based, teachers’ self-directed intervention showed promising effects on promoting preschoolers’ PA at childcare centers. Subsequent studies at larger-scale are needed to fully determine the effectiveness of the intervention strategies used in this study.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
This pilot study evaluated the effects of an intervention employing a physical activity (PA) monitoring system and teachers’ self-directed modifications in instructional strategies to promote PA in preschoolers. Method: Five childcare centers were recruited (N = 93 children, 53% girls, 4.7 ± 0.6 years), and randomly assigned into Control (CON, N = 45) and Intervention (INT, N = 48) groups. The current intervention is based on the social ecological model. It consisted of a real-time PA monitoring system that provided teachers with instant feedback on children’s PA levels. Based on the feedback and their classroom contexts, teachers made self-directed modifications to their instructional strategies to provide more active opportunities. Time spent in sedentary behavior (SED) and total PA (TPA) were measured as primary outcomes using ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer over a 5-day period while children were attending childcare centers. Result: Overall, children in the INT showed significantly lower level of SED (31.6 vs. 33.6 min/hr), and higher level of TPA (28.4 vs. 26.4 min/hr) than children in the CON, after adjusting for age, sex, race, parent education level, parent perception of child’s PA, BMI, and childcare centers. The percentage of hours meeting the PA recommendation (≥ 15min/hr of TPA) was slightly higher the INT than the CON (47.3 % vs. 43.2 %). Conclusion:<\b>
This technology-based, teachers’ self-directed intervention showed promising effects on promoting preschoolers’ PA at childcare centers. Subsequent studies at larger-scale are needed to fully determine the effectiveness of the intervention strategies used in this study.
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