Occupational sedentary time and associations with adiposity markers: a quantile regression analysis
ISPAH ePoster Library. Clarke-Cornwell A. 10/15/18; 225567; 126
Alexandra Clarke-Cornwell
Alexandra Clarke-Cornwell
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract Background:<\b>
Sedentary behaviour is associated with a number of health-related outcomes, independent of physical activity; however, there is limited research that has examined the role that occupational sedentary time contributes to these associations. For those who are economically active, the majority of their sedentary time may be accrued in the workplace. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of occupational sedentary time with waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI). Methods:<\b>
Data were taken from the Health Survey for England, a nationally representative annual survey of adults. In 2008, a subsample wore an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer for 7 days; non-wear time was removed using the Troiano algorithm, and time in occupational sedentary behaviour was extracted using previously derived cut-points. To examine the variable effects of sedentary time on WC and BMI, quantile regression models were used; models were adjusted for age, gender, accelerometer wear-time, lifestyle variables, health status, non-work sedentary time and time in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Results:<\b>
From the accelerometer subsample, 911 were in full-time employment. Occupational sedentary time was not associated with either WC or BMI across quantiles of these adiposity markers, after regression models were adjusted for MVPA: for each 1 minute increase per day in MVPA there were significant associations with reduced WC, and this effect varied with increasing quantiles of WC (β coefficients for the 25th, 50th, 75th quantiles were -0.045, -0.065, -0.101). Conclusion:<\b>
Associations between occupational sedentary time and adiposity markers can be explained by MVPA.
Abstract Background:<\b>
Sedentary behaviour is associated with a number of health-related outcomes, independent of physical activity; however, there is limited research that has examined the role that occupational sedentary time contributes to these associations. For those who are economically active, the majority of their sedentary time may be accrued in the workplace. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of occupational sedentary time with waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI). Methods:<\b>
Data were taken from the Health Survey for England, a nationally representative annual survey of adults. In 2008, a subsample wore an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer for 7 days; non-wear time was removed using the Troiano algorithm, and time in occupational sedentary behaviour was extracted using previously derived cut-points. To examine the variable effects of sedentary time on WC and BMI, quantile regression models were used; models were adjusted for age, gender, accelerometer wear-time, lifestyle variables, health status, non-work sedentary time and time in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Results:<\b>
From the accelerometer subsample, 911 were in full-time employment. Occupational sedentary time was not associated with either WC or BMI across quantiles of these adiposity markers, after regression models were adjusted for MVPA: for each 1 minute increase per day in MVPA there were significant associations with reduced WC, and this effect varied with increasing quantiles of WC (β coefficients for the 25th, 50th, 75th quantiles were -0.045, -0.065, -0.101). Conclusion:<\b>
Associations between occupational sedentary time and adiposity markers can be explained by MVPA.
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings