Older Canadian adults living in public housing’s perceptions of access to physical activity in their residential environment: a study using walk-along interviews
ISPAH ePoster Library. Saint-Onge K. 10/15/18; 225568; 176
Ms. Kadia Saint-Onge
Ms. Kadia Saint-Onge
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Older adults and low-income individuals have been described as “hard to reach” through physical activity promotion. Worldwide, health inequalities have been observed between older adults having a low-income compared to the general population. In Quebec, Canada, the gap is even greater between low-income individuals living in public housing and those living in private dwellings. Improved access to physical activity in their residential environment (apartment, building and close neighbourhood) could possibly improve older adults living in public housing’s activity levels and thus their well-being. METHOD: Individual walk-along interviews were conducted with 27 older adults living in three public housing sites in Montreal, Canada. Thematic analysis served to survey perceptions of opportunities, facilitators and barriers to everyday all-level physical activity. Two raters coded transcripts guided by the Environmental human-friendliness model (EHF). It identifies four residential environment structures considered to foster well-being: 1) physical (built environment), 2) functional (available services), 3) participative (community participation) and 4) sociocultural (interpersonal interactions). RESULTS: Notable factors emerged from the participative, functional and sociocultural structures, but not the physical structure. Facilitators include an active tenants’ association as well as knowledge and availability of low-cost opportunities, accompanied by information on which are appropriate according to specific health conditions. Conversely, interpersonal relations and low perception of control on their environment could hinder tenants’ physical activity. CONCLUSION: The EHF model allowed to reveal factors that may specifically help or hinder older adults living in public housing’s physical activity. Potential courses of action will be discussed. External funding details Funded by the FRQ-SC.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
Older adults and low-income individuals have been described as “hard to reach” through physical activity promotion. Worldwide, health inequalities have been observed between older adults having a low-income compared to the general population. In Quebec, Canada, the gap is even greater between low-income individuals living in public housing and those living in private dwellings. Improved access to physical activity in their residential environment (apartment, building and close neighbourhood) could possibly improve older adults living in public housing’s activity levels and thus their well-being. METHOD: Individual walk-along interviews were conducted with 27 older adults living in three public housing sites in Montreal, Canada. Thematic analysis served to survey perceptions of opportunities, facilitators and barriers to everyday all-level physical activity. Two raters coded transcripts guided by the Environmental human-friendliness model (EHF). It identifies four residential environment structures considered to foster well-being: 1) physical (built environment), 2) functional (available services), 3) participative (community participation) and 4) sociocultural (interpersonal interactions). RESULTS: Notable factors emerged from the participative, functional and sociocultural structures, but not the physical structure. Facilitators include an active tenants’ association as well as knowledge and availability of low-cost opportunities, accompanied by information on which are appropriate according to specific health conditions. Conversely, interpersonal relations and low perception of control on their environment could hinder tenants’ physical activity. CONCLUSION: The EHF model allowed to reveal factors that may specifically help or hinder older adults living in public housing’s physical activity. Potential courses of action will be discussed. External funding details Funded by the FRQ-SC.
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