The effect of physical activity and dietary behaviours on the blood pressure and hypertension status of food-insecure overweight adults living in resource-poor South African communities
ISPAH ePoster Library. Okop K. 10/15/18; 225582; 147
Dr. Kufre Okop
Dr. Kufre Okop
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:<\b>
More than 50% of South Africans are reportedly inactive, nearly 70% of women are overweight or obese, and about half of all households are food insecure. The aim of this analysis was to determine the effect of physical activity (PA), dietary behaviours and obesity on blood pressure levels and hypertension among food insecure overweight persons (FIO). . Methods:<\b>
A longitudinal study included 800 adults (212 men, 588 women, 29-78 years) from the harmonized STOP-SA study cohort. Standardised instruments were used to measure PA (GPAQ and IPAQ) and food security. Diet behaviour was assessed with food frequency questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured using Omron HEM-412. Food insecure overweight (FIO) were defined as those with BMI>25 kg/m2 who reported having insufficient food to eat or meet household nutrition requirements. Multivariate regression analyses were undertaken. Results:<\b>
Nearly a third (27.8%) of the study sample were FIO. FIO compared to the rest of the study sample had a higher intake of SSBs (10.9 vs. 9.5 servings/week, p=0.025). Controlling for age, sex and follow-up duration, MPVA, intake of fruits and vegetables were not associated with hypertension or SBP levels for FIO. However, FIO reporting a-10 or more servings of SSB/week and being a female respectively were 2.3 times and 1.4 times (p-value<0.05) more likely to have hypertension. Conclusion:<\b>
Increasing SSB intake can impact on hypertension among the food insecure obese individuals in the resource-poor South African setting. External funding details National Research Foundation of South Africa, NIH, CHIR.
Abstract Introduction:<\b>
More than 50% of South Africans are reportedly inactive, nearly 70% of women are overweight or obese, and about half of all households are food insecure. The aim of this analysis was to determine the effect of physical activity (PA), dietary behaviours and obesity on blood pressure levels and hypertension among food insecure overweight persons (FIO). . Methods:<\b>
A longitudinal study included 800 adults (212 men, 588 women, 29-78 years) from the harmonized STOP-SA study cohort. Standardised instruments were used to measure PA (GPAQ and IPAQ) and food security. Diet behaviour was assessed with food frequency questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured using Omron HEM-412. Food insecure overweight (FIO) were defined as those with BMI>25 kg/m2 who reported having insufficient food to eat or meet household nutrition requirements. Multivariate regression analyses were undertaken. Results:<\b>
Nearly a third (27.8%) of the study sample were FIO. FIO compared to the rest of the study sample had a higher intake of SSBs (10.9 vs. 9.5 servings/week, p=0.025). Controlling for age, sex and follow-up duration, MPVA, intake of fruits and vegetables were not associated with hypertension or SBP levels for FIO. However, FIO reporting a-10 or more servings of SSB/week and being a female respectively were 2.3 times and 1.4 times (p-value<0.05) more likely to have hypertension. Conclusion:<\b>
Increasing SSB intake can impact on hypertension among the food insecure obese individuals in the resource-poor South African setting. External funding details National Research Foundation of South Africa, NIH, CHIR.
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