Exposure to extreme heat conditions and air pollution by low-income minority children playing in NYC parks
ISPAH ePoster Library. Alberico C. 10/16/18; 225590; 85
Ms. Claudia Alberico
Ms. Claudia Alberico
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Abstract IntroductionChildren’s use of parks and playgrounds make them vulnerable to ultraviolet radiation, episodes of dangerous heat and unhealthy air quality conditions. This study examined how children’s park use and physical activity changed during extreme heat conditions and poor air quality episodes.MethodsTrained observers conducted 1051 SOPARC (System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities) scans in 20 parks (181 total target areas) in low-income, high-minority areas of New York City during spring 2017. 16,603 children (5-10 y) were counted. Scans recorded ethnicity, age, and physical activity. We used METAR data and EPA Air Quality Data to measure weather and air quality conditions at the time of each scan. ResultsDuring episodes of high heat (defined by National Weather Service), attendance of children to the parks was 20.6% lower than in normal conditions. Latino children were more likely to be observed in parks during high heat conditions (IRR=1.693;p<0.001) than Asian (IRR=0.657;p<0.001), or African-American children (IRR=0.809;p=0.031). During high heat episodes, shaded areas gathered 73.8% more children than non-shaded ones. Other significant differences related to high heat exposure and preference for shaded areas were found by gender, for moderate and vigorous activities, and across ethnicities. Children’s park attendance did not change significantly with poor air quality conditions. ConclusionsHigh heat conditions seem to affect children park attendance differently in terms of ethnicity. Park attendance did not change in episodes of poor air quality, putting children at risk. External funding details Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation through the Physical Activity Research Center.
Abstract IntroductionChildren’s use of parks and playgrounds make them vulnerable to ultraviolet radiation, episodes of dangerous heat and unhealthy air quality conditions. This study examined how children’s park use and physical activity changed during extreme heat conditions and poor air quality episodes.MethodsTrained observers conducted 1051 SOPARC (System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities) scans in 20 parks (181 total target areas) in low-income, high-minority areas of New York City during spring 2017. 16,603 children (5-10 y) were counted. Scans recorded ethnicity, age, and physical activity. We used METAR data and EPA Air Quality Data to measure weather and air quality conditions at the time of each scan. ResultsDuring episodes of high heat (defined by National Weather Service), attendance of children to the parks was 20.6% lower than in normal conditions. Latino children were more likely to be observed in parks during high heat conditions (IRR=1.693;p<0.001) than Asian (IRR=0.657;p<0.001), or African-American children (IRR=0.809;p=0.031). During high heat episodes, shaded areas gathered 73.8% more children than non-shaded ones. Other significant differences related to high heat exposure and preference for shaded areas were found by gender, for moderate and vigorous activities, and across ethnicities. Children’s park attendance did not change significantly with poor air quality conditions. ConclusionsHigh heat conditions seem to affect children park attendance differently in terms of ethnicity. Park attendance did not change in episodes of poor air quality, putting children at risk. External funding details Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation through the Physical Activity Research Center.
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