The perceived built and social environments, objectively measured physical activity and body weight changes in a longitudinal cohort of South Africans from low-income communities: STOP-SA (Slow, Stop or Stem the Tide of Obesity in the People of South Africa)
ISPAH ePoster Library. Lambert V. 10/15/18; 225597; 98
Prof. Vicki Lambert
Prof. Vicki Lambert
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract Background:<\b>
South Africa is a middle-income country; nearly half of all households are food insecure. Despite this, >60% of women and >30% of men are overweight/obese, and >50% are insufficiently active. Additionally, the legacy of apartheid legislation reinforced spatial isolation of the built environment. There is a need to identify ecological factors linked to this 'wicked problem' of obesity, food insecurity and physical inactivity. Methods:<\b>
We examined perceived built and social environments, objectively-measured moderate–to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and body composition changes in 247 participants (62% women) of the original Modeling the Epidemiological Transition Study cohort (N=504), living in an urban, low-income township. Weight, body composition, accelerometry (MVPA), and perceived neighbourhood attributes (NEWS,NQLS) were measured. Results:<\b>
Follow-up was 4.5yrs. At baseline, 29% were obese, 40% food insecure. More than 40% gained >5% weight. Multivariate analysis showed perceived neighborhood safety (Beta, -0.05), social cohesion (-0.07), freedom from litter (-0.25), and MPA (min/wk in 1 min bouts, Beta -0.006) were significantly negatively associated with relative gain in body fat/yr (adj R2=0.162). Mediation analysis, controlling for gender, showed neighborhood freedom from litter had a significant inverse correlation (-0.20;p=0.010) with >5% change in body fat. When considering this relationship with the contribution of VPA (min/wk in 1 min bouts), the significance of the correlation (-0.25;p=0.008) increased; indicating that PA is an effect modifier. This study advances our knowledge by demonstrating a prospective association between neighborhood attributes and body composition changes over time, in low-income settings, which may be mediated by PA. External funding details National Research Foundation
Abstract Background:<\b>
South Africa is a middle-income country; nearly half of all households are food insecure. Despite this, >60% of women and >30% of men are overweight/obese, and >50% are insufficiently active. Additionally, the legacy of apartheid legislation reinforced spatial isolation of the built environment. There is a need to identify ecological factors linked to this 'wicked problem' of obesity, food insecurity and physical inactivity. Methods:<\b>
We examined perceived built and social environments, objectively-measured moderate–to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and body composition changes in 247 participants (62% women) of the original Modeling the Epidemiological Transition Study cohort (N=504), living in an urban, low-income township. Weight, body composition, accelerometry (MVPA), and perceived neighbourhood attributes (NEWS,NQLS) were measured. Results:<\b>
Follow-up was 4.5yrs. At baseline, 29% were obese, 40% food insecure. More than 40% gained >5% weight. Multivariate analysis showed perceived neighborhood safety (Beta, -0.05), social cohesion (-0.07), freedom from litter (-0.25), and MPA (min/wk in 1 min bouts, Beta -0.006) were significantly negatively associated with relative gain in body fat/yr (adj R2=0.162). Mediation analysis, controlling for gender, showed neighborhood freedom from litter had a significant inverse correlation (-0.20;p=0.010) with >5% change in body fat. When considering this relationship with the contribution of VPA (min/wk in 1 min bouts), the significance of the correlation (-0.25;p=0.008) increased; indicating that PA is an effect modifier. This study advances our knowledge by demonstrating a prospective association between neighborhood attributes and body composition changes over time, in low-income settings, which may be mediated by PA. External funding details National Research Foundation
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings